Form 10-K 12-31-2005


 

U.S. SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549


FORM 10-KSB
(Mark one)
(X) ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2005

( ) TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from ____________to____________

Commission File Number: 001-13343


AMS HEALTH SCIENCES, INC.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
Oklahoma
73-1016728
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
   
711 N.E. 39th Street
 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
73105
(Address of principal executive offices)
(Zip code)

Registrant’s telephone number including area code: (405) 842-0131

Securities registered under Section 12(b) of the Exchange Act:
Title of each class
Name of each exchange on which registered
Common Stock, $0.0001 Par Value
American Stock Exchange

Securities registered under Section 12(g) of the Exchange Act:

Common Stock, $0.0001 Par Value

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes X No 

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K ( ).

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act) Yes__ No X

The issuer's revenues for the year ended December 31, 2005 were $13,701,324.

The aggregate market value of the issuer's voting and non-voting common stock, $.0001 par value, held by non-affiliates of the issuer as of March 29 2006, was $4,507,513 based on the closing sale price on that date as reported by the American Stock Exchange.

As of March 29, 2006, there were 7,771,574 shares of common stock, par value $0.0001 per share, outstanding.

Documents incorporated by reference: The information called for by Items 9-12 and 14 of Part III is incorporated by reference to the definitive proxy statement for the registrant’s 2006 annual meeting of shareholders, which will be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission not later than 120 days after December 31, 2005.




AMS HEALTH SCIENCES, INC.
FORM 10-KSB
For the Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2005
TABLE OF CONTENTS

Part I.
   
 
Item 1.
 
Description of Business
 
3
 
Item 2.
 
Description of Property
 
19
 
Item 3.
 
Legal Proceedings
 
20
 
Item 4.
 
Submission of Matters to a Vote of Security Holders
 
20
 
Part II.
   
 
Item 5.
Market for Common Equity, Related Shareholder Matters and Small Business Issuer Repurchases of Equity Securities
 
 
20
 
Item 6.
 
Management’s Discussion and Analysis or Plan of Operation
 
21
 
Item 7.
 
Financial Statements
 
29
 
Item 8.
 
Changes In and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure
 
29
 
Item 8A.
 
Controls and Procedures
 
29
 
Item 8B.
 
Other Information
 
30
 
Part III.
 
**
 
 
Item 13.
 
Exhibits
 
30
   

The information called for by Items 9-12 and 14 of Part III is incorporated by reference to the definitive proxy statement for the registrant’s 2006 annual meeting of shareholders, which will be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission not later than 120 days after December 31, 2005.

CAUTIONARY STATEMENT REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING INFORMATION

Certain statements under the captions “Item 1. Description of Business”, “Item 6. Management's Discussion and Analysis or Plan of Operation”, and elsewhere in this report constitute “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. Certain, but not necessarily all, of such forward-looking statements can be identified by the use of forward-looking terminology such as “anticipates”, “believes”, “expects”, “may”, “will”, or “should” or other variations thereon, or by discussions of strategies that involve risks and uncertainties. Our actual results or industry results may be materially different from any future results expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Factors that could cause actual results to differ materially include general economic and business conditions; our ability to implement our business and acquisition strategies; changes in the network marketing industry and changes in consumer preferences; competition; availability of key personnel; increasing operating costs; unsuccessful advertising and promotional efforts; changes in brand awareness; acceptance of new product offerings; changes in, or the failure to comply with, government regulations (especially food and drug laws and regulations); our ability to obtain financing for future acquisitions and other factors. We do not undertake to update forward-looking statements to reflect the impact of circumstances or events that arise after the date the forward-looking statement was made.


PART I

ITEM 1.  BUSINESS
 
AMS Health Sciences, Inc. and its subsidiaries have two operating segments: (1) a marketing segment, operated as AMS Health Sciences, Inc., or AMS, and (2) a manufacturing segment, operated as Heartland Cup, Inc., or Heartland. 

AMS began operations in 1987, and through a corporate reorganization in 1995, became an Oklahoma corporation. In this report the terms “Company”, “us”, “we”, “our” and “its” are used as references to AMS. We develop and distribute performance-based nutritional, weight loss and personal care products. We distribute our products through a network marketing system using independent distributors that we refer to as “associates”.

Network marketing appeals to a wide cross-section of people, particularly those seeking to supplement income, start a home-based business, or pursue entrepreneurial opportunities other than conventional full-time employment.  We consider our attractive compensation plan and monthly cash bonus pools, along with trips, prizes and incentives, to be attractive components of the AMS network marketing system.

Our marketing plan is designed to provide associates financial incentives for our associates to build and manage a team of recruited associates in their downline organization.

On an ongoing basis, we review our product line for duplication and sales movement and make adjustments accordingly. As of December 31, 2005, our primary product lines consisted of:

 
·
24 nutritional products;

 
·
5 weight management products; and

 
·
33 personal care products consisting primarily of skin care products.

Our products are manufactured by various manufacturers pursuant to formulations developed for us and are sold to our independent associates located in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and Canada.

We believe that our network marketing system is ideally suited to market nutritional, weight management and personal care products because sales of such products are strengthened by ongoing personal contact between associates and their customers. Associates are given the opportunity through sponsored events and training sessions to network with other associates, develop selling skills and establish personal goals. We supplement monetary incentives with other forms of recognition in order to further motivate and foster an atmosphere of excitement throughout our associate network.

Manufacturing. In September 2005, we entered into a definitive Stock Purchase Agreement with Heartland and its principal shareholder for the purchase of all of the principal shareholder’s stock in Heartland. Upon closing of the Stock Purchase Agreement, we acquired 2,000,000 shares, or approximately 83% of the outstanding capital stock of Heartland, for 200,000 shares of our common stock. In addition, we paid approximately $200,000 to acquire the remaining shares of Heartland. Heartland is a manufacturer of foam cups, distributed through a number of contracts. Heartland has exclusive contracts with the State of Oklahoma and the Department of Defense, as well as a number of restaurants, and one of the large airlines.

As described in Item 3. Legal Proceedings, we have filed suit against Truett McCarty with the District Court of Oklahoma County, State of Oklahoma relating to our acquisition of Heartland. We believe that Mr. McCarty has both defrauded us regarding the financial conditions and results of operations of Heartland, as well as breached certain representations and warranties in the stock purchase agreement relating to the Heartland acquisition. It is our belief that, had we been aware of the true facts and circumstances regarding Heartland’s financial condition and historical results of operations, we would not have purchased Heartland. We presently believe that the dedication of our time and attention to Heartland is neither in our or our stockholders’ best interests. As a result, we expect to either sell Heartland or discontinue its operations by the end of the first quarter, 2006. As such, any further discussion of Heartland and its operations in this report will be limited to the discussions included in our audited financial statements, Item 2. Properties, Item 3. Legal Proceedings, and Item 6. Management’s Discussion and Analysis or Plan of Operation. We have not yet formalized a plan to discontinue the Heartland operations. As such, our consolidated financial statements do not reflect Heartland as a discontinued operation. Similarly, since no plan of discontinued operation is in place, we cannot determine what the ultimate impact of the sale or discontinuation of the Heartland operations will have on our financial condition or results of operations.


Key Operating Strengths

We are an eighteen year-old company with strong management. Our principal objective is to be a leading developer and distributor of weight loss products and performance-based wellness systems. Our strategy to achieve this objective and maintain our position in the industry is to capitalize on our operating strengths, which include a strong product development capability, an attractive compensation plan for associates and an experienced management team.
 
Performance-based Products. We have developed a line of high-quality health products based on industry demand.  We believe that the development and delivery of essential vitamins, minerals, and other supplements will help individuals achieve top physical, mental and emotional performance.
 
Product Development. Our product development effort is based on the identification of next generation health discoveries, anticipation of consumer demand and the acquisition of completed and tested new product technology. Our management team continually:
 
 
·
Investigates health, performance and industry trends for new natural extracts and formulated products;
 
 
·
Searches for formulations and ingredients that may be candidates for new products;
 
 
·
Identifies and compares existing and newly identified nutritional supplements;
 
 
·
Updates and improves existing products as new discoveries in nutrition are made; and
 
 
·
Prepares products to comply with regulatory requirements of international markets we enter.
   
Manufacturing. We outsource all manufacturing of our own products for the following reasons:
 
· Quality control is easier to monitor at established facilities;
 
· The market for quality services in the marketplace is competitive and attractive; and
 
 
·
We believe our financial resources are better allocated to product development, marketing services and sales support.

Attractive Associate Compensation Plans and Benefits. We are committed to providing highly competitive compensation plans to attract and retain associates, who constitute our sales force.  We believe our associate compensation plans are some of the most financially rewarding in the network marketing industry.  We pay daily incentives for recruiting new associates and weekly commissions for product sales.  Our compensation plans are consistent plans, meaning associates can recruit and receive compensation daily and weekly for their business in any market in which we conduct business. To drive sales and provide product information and team management skills for associates, we sponsor events throughout the year which offer information about our products and the network marketing system. These meetings are designed to assist new associates with business development and provide a forum for product development, in addition to providing interaction with successful associates and our management.
 
Experienced Management Team.  Our management team includes individuals with expertise in various managerial disciplines, including marketing, customer service, information technology, finance and operations.  The current executive management team is responsible for developing an infrastructure to support growth, strengthen our financial condition, and improve operational controls.

Growth Strategy

We seek to grow our business by pursuing the following strategies:

New Associate and Preferred Customer Recruiting, Training and Development. We recognize the need to aggressively grow our associate sales force, thereby building new sales. On March 6, 2004, we announced the launch of our three-phase 2004 mass marketing preferred customer acquisition program using a free trial format. The three products, Prime One, AM-300 fat burning solution and ToppFast meal replacement shake, were packaged in two free trial programs and represented our core adaptogen and weight loss products, targeting consumer demand for increased energy, reduced belly fat and recognizable weight loss.


On April 5, 2005, we announced that we were transitioning the free trial program from a highly capital intensive program, to a program that is profitable on a per transaction basis. The free trial program did not generate the required retention to make it profitable long term. Transitioning the free trial sign up momentum with a refined enrollment program delivers reduced enrollment expense and higher monthly product autoship retention.

In September 2005, we introduced our new liquid nutritional supplement, Prime Delight. Prime Delight is pomegranate-based and combines powerful antioxidants with adaptogens and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) into an exceptional liquid supplement with a myriad of nutritional benefits. This proprietary formula can provide an essential addition to a heart-healthy lifestyle. Sales of Prime Delight began September 15, 2005, and represent approximately $600,000 of our 2005 revenue.

New Market Entry. We believe that, in addition to the U.S. and Canadian markets, significant growth opportunities continue to exist in international markets.  We intend to select new markets following an assessment of several factors including market size, anticipated demand for AMS products, receptivity to network marketing, and ease of entry, which includes consideration of possible regulatory restrictions on our products or network marketing system.  We will begin preparation for further international expansion as sales leadership develops.  We envision a seamlessly integrated associate compensation plan in each market that allows associates to receive commissions for global sales.  This seamless downline (associate’s sales organization, including the associate’s recruits and their recruits) structure would be designed to allow an associate to build a global network by creating downlines across national borders. Associates would not be required to establish new downlines or to re-qualify for higher levels of compensation in newly opened markets.  We believe that going to a seamless compensation plan provides significant motivation and reward for associates to expand internationally by entering these new markets. In August 2004, we announced the opening of marketing and distribution in Puerto Rico, including the implementation of our free trial program. Sales to Canada comprised approximately $214,000 of our 2005 net revenue.
 
New Product Introduction. Using our marketing demand and development capabilities, we will continue to introduce new products and continuously enhance existing products. In September 2005, we introduced our new liquid nutritional supplement, Prime Delight. Prime Delight is pomegranate-based and combines powerful antioxidants with adaptogens and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) into an exceptional liquid supplement with a myriad of nutritional benefits. This proprietary formula can provide an essential addition to a heart-healthy lifestyle.
 
Strategic Acquisitions. We believe that attractive acquisition opportunities may arise in the future.  We intend to pursue strategic acquisition opportunities that would grow our customer base, expand product lines, enhance manufacturing and technical expertise, allow vertical integration, or otherwise complement our business or further our strategic goals.

Industry Overview

The nutrition industry includes many small- and medium-sized companies that manufacture and distribute products generally intended to maintain the body’s health and general well being.  The four major product categories within the nutrition industry are as follows:
 
 
·
Nutritional Supplements - products such as vitamins and minerals, sports performance enhancers, meal replacements, dietary supplements, herbs and botanicals, and compounds derived from these substances;
 
 
·
Natural and Organic Foods - products such as cereals, milk, non-dairy beverages, and frozen entrees;
 
 
·
Functional Foods - products with added ingredients or fortification specifically for health or performance purposes; and
 
 
·
Personal Care - products combining nutrition with skin care.
 
We believe that the nutrition industry is being fueled by the following:
 
 
·
The public’s exposure to more widely accepted natural and homeopathic alternatives;
 
 
·
The generation of baby-boomers’ desire to slow down the aging process;
 
 
·
The national and worldwide trend toward preventive health care combining Eastern and Western medicine; and
 


 
·
The rapid product introductions taking place in response to scientific research fueled by new demand.
 
Nutritional products are distributed through six major sales channels.  Each channel has changed in recent years, primarily due to advances in technology and communications, resulting in improved product distribution and faster dissemination of information.  The major sales channels are as follows (AMS associates participate in four of the six channels listed below):

 
·
Mass market retailers, including mass merchandisers, drug stores, supermarkets and discount stores;
 
 
·
Natural health food retailers;
 
 
·
Network marketing;
 
 
·
Mail order;
 
 
·
Healthcare professionals and practitioners; and
 
 
·
The Internet.

Products

Our primary product lines include nutritional, weight management and personal care. We currently market approximately 60 products, exclusive of variations in product size, colors or similar variations of our basic product line.

Nutritional. This product line includes antioxidants, minerals, vitamins, and other nutritional supplements.  The nutritional supplement products are designed to provide optimal absorption, bioavailability, and efficacy. During the years ended December 31, 2005, 2004 and 2003, 63.3%, 44.0% and 44.9% of our net marketing sales were derived from the 24 products in the nutritional category, which contain herbs, vitamins, minerals and other natural ingredients. The top-selling products in this category are Prime Delight, Prime One, Prime One Concentrate and Spark of Life liquid nutritional which totaled approximately 4.9%, 17.5%, 10.3% and 4.0%, respectively, of net marketing sales in 2005. 

Weight Management.  This product line was developed to provide a comprehensive approach to weight management including the AM-300 and AM-5000 families of weight loss supplements, along with weight loss systems. During the years ended December 31, 2005, 2004 and 2003, the weight management category represented 23.3%, 46.3% and 48.0% of our net marketing sales. Sales were derived from the five products in the weight management category that we market under the AMS Health Sciences label.

Personal Care. This product line includes scientifically developed natural products designed to support healthy skin and hair. Products in this line include those from the Chambre International line and products acquired from Dr. Robert Nakamura and Immudyne Inc. During the years ended December 31, 2005, 2004 and 2003, 2.7%, 2.3% and 2.8% of our net marketing sales were derived from the 33 products in the personal care category.
 
Promotional Materials. In addition to these three principal product lines, we have developed and sell to associates materials and online tools designed to assist them in building their business and selling products.  These sales aids are generally written and produced by AMS and include product audio tapes, CD ROM’S, video tapes, brochures and business forms designed by us and printed by outside publishers.  We periodically contract with authors and publishers to produce or provide books, tapes, and other items dealing with health topics and personal motivation, which are made available to associates. 

New associates are required to purchase an enrollment packet containing training materials that assist in beginning and growing a business.  Associates do not earn commissions on the sale of sales aids or enrollment packets. 

Other Products and Services. Prior to focusing on nutritional, weight management and personal care products in October 1993, we marketed various packages of consumer benefit services provided by third-party providers. The only remaining benefit service we offer is a pre-paid legal service. The pre-paid legal services are provided by Pre-Paid Legal Services, Inc. This program membership represented less than 1% of our net marketing sales during 2005, 2004 and 2003.


New Product Identification. We are committed to continuous product innovation and improvement through market demand and products backed by science.  The mission of our science and product development is to develop products that deliver noticeable results, slow the aging process, reduce the risk of chronic illness, and promote long-term health.  New product ideas and research efforts are supported using a combination of our advisory talent and research, third-party studies and sponsored research.  We intend to dedicate resources for the science and development of new products and reformulation of existing products. Prior to introducing new products, we investigate product formulation as it relates to regulatory compliance and other issues.

For products on which we acquire the distribution or ownership rights, we maintain and access any and all science and research related to those products. For example, the acquisition of Prime One brought over 45 years of research and thousands of trials and studies on the Prime One products and ingredients.

We rely upon the product development staff of Chemins Company, Inc. and other manufacturers, independent researchers, vendor research departments and others for such services. When a new product concept is identified or when an existing product must be reformulated, the new product concept or reformulation project is generally submitted to Chemins for technical development and implementation. We continually review our existing products for potential enhancements to improve their effectiveness and marketability. While we consider our product formulations to be proprietary trade secrets, such formulations are not patented. Accordingly, there is no assurance that another company will not replicate one or more of our products.

Product Procurement and Distribution; Insurance. Essentially all of our product line in the weight management category is manufactured by Chemins Company, Inc. utilizing our product formulations. Naturtech manufactures essentially all of our nutritional product line, and essentially all of our product line in the personal care category is manufactured by GDMI, Inc. and Columbia Cosmetics, Inc.

All our vendors have assured us that they conduct quality control processes, and laboratory analysts test for biological contamination of raw materials and finished goods.  In the analytical chemistry laboratory, analysts test for chemical contamination and accurate active ingredient levels of raw materials and finished products.  Both laboratories conduct stability tests on finished products to determine product shelf life. 

We have not generally entered into long-term supply agreements with the manufacturers of our product line or the third-party providers of our consumer benefit services. However, we customarily enter into contracts with our manufacturers and suppliers to establish the terms and conditions of purchases. Our arrangements with Chemins Company, Inc. may be terminated by either party upon the completion of any outstanding purchase orders. Therefore, there can be no assurance that Chemins will continue to manufacture our products or provide research, development and formulation services. In the event the relationship with any of our manufacturers becomes impaired, we will be required to obtain alternative manufacturing sources for our products. In such event, there is no assurance that the manufacturing processes of our current manufacturers can be replicated by another manufacturer. Although we have not previously experienced product unavailability or supply interruptions, we believe that we would be able to obtain alternative sources for our nutritional, weight management and personal care products. A significant delay or reduction in availability of products, however, could have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results and financial condition.
 
Most of the raw materials used in the manufacture of our products are available from a number of suppliers.  We have not generally experienced difficulty in obtaining necessary quantities of raw materials.  When supplies of certain raw materials have tightened, we have been able to find alternative sources as needed, and believe we will be able to do so in the future if the need arises.

We, like other marketers of products that are intended to be ingested, face an inherent risk of exposure to product liability claims in the event that the use of our products results in injury. We have evaluated the risk associated with consumption of our current products and, based on the indemnification given by our manufacturers and the current product mix, we cancelled our product liability insurance in August 2005. Products containing ephedra, which represented 9.7% of our 2004 net sales, and none of our 2005 net sales, were not covered by our product liability insurance. All of our product manufacturers carry product liability insurance, which covers our products. Such product claims against us could adversely affect product sales, results of our operations, financial condition and the value of our common stock.

        All of the items in our product line include a customer satisfaction guarantee. Within 30 days of purchase, any retail customer or associate who is not satisfied with our product for any reason may return it or any unused portion to the associate from whom it was purchased or to us for a full refund or credit toward the purchase of another product. Associates may obtain replacements from us for products returned to them by retail customers if they return such products on a timely basis. Furthermore, in most jurisdictions, we maintain a buy-back program. Under this program,


we will repurchase products sold to an associate, subject to a 10% restocking charge, provided the associate resigns and returns the product in marketable condition within 12 months of original purchase, or longer where required by applicable state law or regulations. We believe this buy-back program addresses a number of the regulatory compliance issues pertaining to network marketing systems. For the years ended December 31, 2005, 2004 and 2003, the cost of products returned to us was 7.1%, 3.7% and 0.9% of gross sales. The increase in 2004 and 2005 returns was due to the cancellation of first autoshipments under our free trial program. We believe the cost of returned products will trend back down to less than 1% of sales going forward.

Our product line is distributed principally from our facilities in Oklahoma City. Products are warehoused in Oklahoma City.
 
Network Marketing

We market and distribute our products through a network marketing system and sell directly to associates and preferred customers.  At December 31, 2005, we had approximately 15,000 "active" associates. To be considered "active" an associate must have purchased $50 in products or $22 on autoship of our products within the preceding 90 days. Network marketing is a form of person-to-person direct selling through a network of vertically organized independent distributors who purchase products at wholesale prices from the manufacturer for resale to retail consumers.  The emergence of readily available means of mass communication such as personal computers, facsimiles, low-cost long distance telephone services, and the Internet has contributed to the rapid growth of network marketing.  The concept of network marketing is based on the strength of personal recommendations that frequently come from friends, neighbors, relatives, and close acquaintances.  We believe that network marketing is an effective way to distribute our products because it allows person-to-person product education, which is not as readily available through other distribution channels. We believe our network marketing system appeals to a broad cross-section of people, particularly those seeking to:

 
·
Supplement family income;
 
 
·
Start a home business; or
 
 
·
Pursue employment opportunities other than conventional, full-time employment.

A majority of our associates therefore sell our products on a part-time basis.

We believe that our network marketing system is ideally suited to market our product line because sales of such products are strengthened by ongoing personal contact between retail consumers and associates, many of whom use our products themselves. Sales are made through direct personal sales presentations as well as presentations made to groups in a format known as "opportunity meetings." These sales methods are designed to encourage individuals to purchase our products by informing potential customers and associates of our product line and results of personal use, and the potential financial benefits of becoming an associate. The objective of the marketing program is to develop a broad based network marketing organization within a relatively short period. Our marketing efforts are typically focused on middle-income families and individuals.

Our network marketing program encourages individuals to develop their own downline network marketing organizations. Each new associate is either linked to:

 
·
The existing associate that personally enrolled the new associate into our network marketing organization; or
 
 
·
The existing associate in the enrolling associate's downline as specified at the time of enrollment.

Growth of an associate's downline organization is dependent upon the recruiting and enrollment of additional associates within such associate's downline organization.

Associates are encouraged to assume responsibility for training and motivation of others within their downline organization and to conduct opportunity meetings as soon as they are appropriately trained. We strive to maintain a high level of motivation, morale, enthusiasm and integrity among the members of our network marketing organization.

We believe this result is achieved through a combination of products, sales incentives, personal recognition of outstanding achievement and quality promotional materials. Under our network marketing program, associates purchase sales aids and brochures from us and assume the costs of advertising and marketing our product line to their customers as well as the direct cost of recruiting new associates. We believe that this form of sales organization is cost


efficient because our direct sales expenses are primarily limited to the payment of bonuses, which are only incurred when products are sold.

We continually strive to improve our marketing strategies, including the compensation structure within our network marketing organization and the variety and mix of products in our line, to attract and motivate associates. These efforts are designed to increase monthly product sales and the recruiting of new associates.

To aid associates in easily meeting the monthly personal product purchase requirement to qualify for bonuses, we developed the "autoship" in 1994. Under the autoship purchasing arrangement, associates establish a standing product order for an amount in excess of $22 that is automatically charged to their credit card or deducted from their bank account for goods shipped that month. At December 31, 2005, 2004 and 2003, we had approximately 30,663, 29,161 and 16,343 associates participating in the autoship.

We have two bonus structures which provide for payment of bonuses on product purchases made by other associates in an associate's downline organization, a secured infinity compensation plan, and a two-team, or binary, compensation plan. Under the secured infinity plan, associates derive income as follows:
 
 
·
First, associates earn profits by purchasing from our product line at wholesale prices (which are discounted up to 40% from suggested retail prices) and selling to customers at retail;

 
·
Second, associates earn profits from the products sold in the sign-up of new associates from our enroller and coding bonuses, which are tied to the downline organization;

 
·
Third, associates who establish their own downline organization may earn bonuses of up to 36% of bonus value on product purchases by associates within the first four levels of their downline organization;

 
·
Fourth, associates who have $600 per month of product purchases on their first and second levels combined, become directors and have the opportunity to build an additional director downline organization and receive additional bonuses of 4% of bonus value on product purchases by such downline organization;

 
·
Fifth, associates who have $1,200 per month of product purchases on their first and second levels combined, two director legs and $2,500 wholesale volume monthly in their downline, become silver directors and have the opportunity to build an additional silver director downline organization and receive additional bonuses of 5% of bonus value on product purchases by such downline organization;

 
·
Sixth, associates who have $1,800 per month of product purchases on their first level and second levels combined, two silver legs and have a total of $5,000 wholesale volume monthly in their downline, become gold directors and have the opportunity to receive an additional bonus of 3% of bonus value on product purchases by their silver director downline organization. In addition, gold directors have the opportunity to receive additional bonuses of up to 3% of bonus value on the product purchases by associates of silver director downline organizations that originate from their silver director downline organization through four generations; and

 
·
Seventh, associates who maintain the gold director requirements and develop three gold directors, each one from a separate leg of their downline organization plus $40,000 wholesale volume in downline organization, become platinum directors and have the opportunity to build an additional platinum director downline organization and receive additional bonuses of 5% of bonus value on product purchases by such downline organization.

Combining these levels of bonuses, our total "pay-out" on products subject to bonuses under the secured infinity compensation plan is approximately 63% of the bonus value of product sales, and 42.1% of total sales.

Under the binary plan, associates derive income as follows:

 
·
First, associates earn profits by purchasing from our product line at wholesale prices (which are discounted up to 40% from suggested retail prices) and selling to customers at retail;

 
·
Second, associates earn profits from the products sold in the sign-up of new associates from our enroller bonuses and weekly bonuses of 10% of bonus value on the pay side volume;



 
·
Third, associates who establish their own downline organization may earn the weekly bonus on the pay side volume, and a 50% matching bonus on the weekly bonuses of the first generation recruits in their downline organization;

 
·
Fourth, associates who have $5,000 per month of product purchases in their pay side volume, and have four personally enrolled active associates, become directors and have the opportunity to build an additional director downline organization and receive additional matching bonuses of 20% of the weekly bonuses of the second generation in their downline organization;

 
·
Fifth, associates who have $25,000 per month of product purchases in their pay side volume, and have four personally enrolled active associates, become silver directors and have the opportunity to build an additional silver director downline organization and receive additional matching bonuses of 10% of the weekly bonuses of the third generation in their downline organization;

 
·
Sixth, associates who have $50,000 per month of product purchases in their pay side volume, and have four personally enrolled active associates, become gold directors and have the opportunity to build an additional gold director downline organization and receive additional matching bonuses of 10% of the weekly bonuses of the fourth generation in their downline organization; and

 
·
Seventh, associates who have $100,000 per month of product purchases in their pay side volume, and have four personally enrolled active associates, become platinum directors and have the opportunity to build an additional platinum director downline organization and receive additional matching bonuses of 10% of the weekly bonuses of the fifth generation in their downline organization.

Each associate in our network marketing organization has a director, a silver director, a gold director and a platinum director. Each director has a silver director, a gold director and a platinum director. Each silver director has a gold director and a platinum director. Each gold director has a platinum director. As of December 31, 2005, we had 232 silver directors, 330 gold directors and 90 platinum directors.

We maintain a computerized system for processing associate orders and calculating bonus payments which enable us to remit such payments promptly. We believe that prompt and accurate remittance of bonuses is vital to recruiting and maintaining associates, as well as increasing their motivation and loyalty to us. We make weekly bonus payments based upon the previous week's product purchases, while most network marketing companies only make monthly bonus payments. During 2005, 2004 and 2003, we paid bonuses to 4,892, 9,565 and 6,824 associates, in the aggregate amounts of $5,231,879, $8,470,653 and $7,504,420, respectively.

We are committed to providing the best possible support to our associates. Associates in our network marketing organization are provided training guides and are given the opportunity to participate in our training programs. We sponsor regularly scheduled conference calls for our platinum directors which include testimonials from successful associates and satisfied customers, as well as current product and promotional information. We produce a monthly newsletter which provides information on our products and network marketing system. The newsletter is designed to help recruit new associates by answering commonly asked questions and includes product information and business building information. The newsletter also provides a forum for additional recognition of associates for outstanding performance. In addition, we regularly sponsor training sessions for our associates across the United States. At these training sessions, associates are provided the opportunity to learn more about our product line and selling techniques, so they can build their businesses more rapidly. We produce comprehensive and attractive four color catalogues and brochures that display and describe our product line. We maintain a web page at www.amsonline.com, which provides general company information along with product line and network marketing system information.

From time to time, associates fail to adhere to the AMS policies and procedures, including those governing the marketing of our products or representations regarding the compensation plans.  We systematically review reports of alleged associate misbehavior.  Infractions of the policies and procedures are reported to a compliance committee that determines what disciplinary action may be warranted in each case.  If we determine that an associate has violated any of our policies and procedures, we may take a number of disciplinary actions.  For example, we may terminate the associate’s purchase and distribution rights completely, or impose sanctions such as warnings, fines, or probation.  We may also withdraw or deny awards, suspend privileges, withhold commissions until specific conditions are satisfied, or take other appropriate actions at our discretion. An in-house compliance department also routinely reviews associate activities.



We believe that the ability to efficiently manage distribution, compensation, manufacturing, inventory control and communications functions through the use of sophisticated and dependable information processing systems iscritical to our success.  To optimally support our customer base and core business processes, our information technology resources consist of a customized, Web-enabled order-entry system and an integrated system to manage inventory, production planning, fulfillment and financial information.  Our information systems are maintained by in-house staff and outside consultants. These systems are designed to provide, among other things, financial and operating data for management, timely and accurate product ordering, bonus payment processing, inventory management and detailed associate records. Since 1994, we have invested more than $3.3 million to enhance our computer and telecommunications systems.

Regulation

In the United States, as well as in any foreign markets in which we may sell our marketing products, we are subject to laws, regulations, administrative determinations, court decisions and similar compliance requirements and restrictions at the federal, state and local levels, collectively known as “regulations”. These regulations include and pertain to, among other things:
 
 
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The formulation, manufacturing, packaging, labeling, advertising, distribution, importation, sale and storage of our products;
 
 
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Our product claims and advertising, including label claims, direct claims and advertising, websites and testimonials, as well as claims and advertising by associates, for which we may be held responsible; and
 
 
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Our network marketing organization and activities.
 
Products. The formulation, manufacturing, packaging, labeling, advertising, distribution and sale and storage of our products are subject to regulation by a number of governmental agencies. The federal agencies include the Food and Drug Administration, or FDA, the Federal Trade Commission, or FTC, the Consumer Product Safety Commission, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the Environmental Protection Agency, or EPA. Our activities are also regulated by various codes and agencies of the states, localities and foreign countries in which our products are or may be manufactured, distributed or sold. The FDA, in particular, regulates the formulation, manufacturing and labeling of dietary supplements, cosmetics and skin care products, including many of our products.
 
The Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994, or DSHEA, revised the provisions of the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, or FFDCA, concerning the composition and labeling of dietary supplements, which we believe is generally favorable to the dietary supplement industry. DSHEA created a new statutory category of products, or “dietary supplements”. This new category includes vitamins, minerals, herbs, amino acids, and other dietary substances for human use to supplement the diet. However, DSHEA grandfathered, with certain limitations, dietary ingredients that were on the market before October 15, 1994. A dietary supplement containing a new dietary ingredient, or NDI, and placed on the market on or after October 15, 1994, must have a history of use or other evidence establishing a basis for “reasonable expectation of safety”. Manufacturers of dietary supplements using a “structure-function” statement or claim must have scientific substantiation that the statement is truthful, accurate, and not misleading. The majority of our sales come from products that are classified as dietary supplements under the FFDCA and DSHEA.
 
The labeling requirements for dietary supplements, with respect to labels affixed to containers, have been set forth in final regulations, effective March 23, 1999. These regulations include how to state the serving size, declare dietary ingredient information, and the proper detail and format required for the “Supplement Facts” box. During 1999, we revised our product labels to be in compliance with those regulations. Many states have also recently become active in the regulation of dietary supplement products. These states may require modification of labeling or formulation of certain of our products sold in these states, e.g. Texas, New York, and California. Finally, in recent years, California courts have grown increasingly active in consumer protection and “private Attorney General” lawsuits, some of which have targeted certain herbal supplement ingredients, such as Kava Kava or Ginseng. These suits have not directly affected our products or sales, but we continue to be aware of California’s Business and Professional Code (especially as to advertising of products), and litigation in California, particularly regarding Proposition 65 (or Prop 65), which disallows many ingredients (believed to be carcinogenic or otherwise unsafe) contained in products sold in that state. AMS has never been sued in California regarding such suits, and our regulatory attorney keeps us apprised of any supplement ingredients that are the subject of lawsuits there.
 


On January 6, 2000, the FDA published a Final Rule on permissible structure/function statements to be placed on labels and in brochures. Structure/function statements are claims of the benefit or positive effect of a product or an ingredient on the body’s structure or function. This regulation does not significantly change the way that the FDA interprets structure/function statements, since DSHEA was passed in 1994. Thus, we did not make any substantial label revisions based on this regulation regarding any of our structure/function product statements. Then on November 9, 2004, the FDA published a Notice in the Federal Register that the level of science needed to support a structure/function claim would be raised close to the current FTC standard, which is “competent and reliable scientific evidence”. We believe that AMS has adequate substantiation for all label claims used.
 
Ephedra and other “Stimulants.” As a marketer of products that are ingested by consumers, we are subject to the risk that one or more of the ingredients in our products may become the subject of adverse regulatory action. For example, one of the ingredients in our prior AM-300 product was ephedra, an herb that contains naturally-occurring ephedrine alkaloids. Our manufacturer used a powdered extract of that herb when manufacturing AM-300. We marketed AM-300 principally as an aid in weight management. The extract was an 8% extract, which means that every 100 milligrams of the powdered extract contains approximately eight milligrams of naturally occurring ephedrine alkaloids.
 
On February 11, 2004, the FDA issued and published in the Federal Register its final rule on ephedrine-containing supplements, stating that since an “unreasonable risk” had been determined, such supplements would be considered “adulterated” under the FFDCA, and thus may not be sold. In essence, this final rule (or regulation) imposed a national ban on ephedrine supplements. The effective date of this regulation was April 12, 2004. We complied with the new regulation and ceased all sales and advertisement of AM-300 and any other ephedra-containing supplement as of April 12, 2004. The FDA has continuously and vigilantly enforced this total ban on ephedra-containing supplements. As recently as December 6, 2005, the FDA seized yet another shipment of such supplements distributed by companies in Gainesville, Texas and Eugene, Oregon.

For the future, the FDA and also Congress have indicated that they will consider whether alternatives to ephedra, other weight loss and energy stimulants (such as bitter orange), similarly carry an unreasonable risk to the central nervous system, and thus to human health. These proposals to limit stimulant ingredients, if finalized, may necessitate reformulations of some of our weight loss products.
 
Also, in the aftermath of the ephedra ban, on April 22, 2004, in comments before a scientific meeting, then Acting FDA Commissioner, Lester Crawford (and for some months during 2005, FDA Commissioner), outlined what an FDA press release termed a “science-based plan for dietary supplement enforcement”. The press release went on to say that the agency “would soon provide further details about its plan to ensure that the consumer protection provisions of DSHEA are used effectively and appropriately”. Referring to its recent rulemaking on ephedra, the FDA also stated that it “expects to evaluate the available pharmacology, published literature …, evidence-based reviews, and adverse event information” of “individual dietary supplements”. Soon afterwards, this promised FDA document was issued, with the title “Regulatory Strategy for the Further Implementation and Enforcement of the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994”. No new regulations or proposed rules pursuant to this strategy have yet been issued, except that the FDA has recently welcomed and received comments from the industry for a better procedure for the FDA to review a company’s safety information as to a new dietary ingredient, or NDI, in an NDI Notification. The final Guidance document concerning NDI Notifications has not yet been issued by the FDA. At this time, NDI Notifications are not required for any AMS products.
 
Anti-DSHEA Proposed Legislation. Finally, as the press, the FDA, and members of Congress and of the supplement industry have all predicted, the very issuance of the final rule on ephedra has caused Congress to rethink DSHEA, specifically as to how safety in supplements may be ensured, and also as to whether specific categories of dietary ingredients should not be permitted at all. In particular, there is growing sentiment (including from one herbal trade association) to make Adverse Event Reporting (AERs) mandatory for all manufacturers and marketers of dietary supplements, so that the FDA may take action more quickly than it did on ephedra, when a harmful herb or other ingredient is suspected. Since February 2003, there have been several bills proposed in Congress that would amend DSHEA, make safety safeguards stricter, even approaching the rigor and reporting required for FDA-regulated drugs. Some examples are as follows:
 
S. 722 - The Dietary Supplement Safety Act was introduced by Senator Richard Durbin in March 2003, and would greatly undermine DSHEA, especially Section 4 regarding safety, giving the FDA new powers of oversight and blanket authority over whole categories of supplements, including stimulants. Stimulants are used in many weight loss products, including some of our supplements. To the best of our knowledge, this bill and the bill described below (though perhaps under different numbers) are still pending.



H.R. 3377: Beginning on October 28, 2003, Senator McCain chaired Senate Hearings on whether DSHEA adequately protects consumers. Also on October 28, Cong. Susan Davis and Cong. Henry Waxman introduced The Dietary Supplement Access and Awareness Act, H.R. 3377, purporting to be about safety and access for consumers to supplements, but actually recommending severe restrictions and dramatic redefinitions of what constitutes a dietary supplement. This bill would impose several requirements for supplements, including unprecedented FDApre-approval as well as strict AER reporting, and excludes only vitamins and minerals from such new requirements. Like S. 722, this bill would reverse the safety burden of proof in Section 4 of DSHEA (one of the industry’s victories in 1994), and instead require the manufacturer to demonstrate safety, rather than the burden being on the FDA to show “imminent hazard” or “unreasonable risk”.

So far, neither of the bills above, nor any other proposed legislation that would undermine DSHEA or impose additional requirements on supplements, have passed. With the help of our regulatory attorney, we will continue to monitor these anti-DSHEA bills, and determine if any of them become a serious threat to our business. In addition, the two major trade associations of the dietary supplement industry—the American Herbal Products Association, or AHPA, and the National Natural Foods Association, or NNFA—have both been actively lobbying against any bills that would require or lead to unreasonable restraints on the manufacture, labeling, and marketing of dietary supplements.

Formulation. Logically, when an ingredient is a known substance, that is, was on the market as a food or a supplement prior to passage of DSHEA (October 15, 1994), it is “grandfathered in”, and allowed in a supplement with no premarket requirement—though still subject to FDA safety enforcement. Conversely, under Section 8, new dietary ingredients (NDIs) are subject to a premarket notification requirement, whereby the manufacturer must demonstrate that the new supplement containing this new substance has a reasonable expectation of safety. NDI notifications--which include toxicology and animal studies--must be filed 75 days before marketing the new supplement. AMS does not include new dietary ingredients in its supplement formulas, but rather uses well-studied and traditional herbs and food ingredients. Thus, we have never been required to file an NDI Notification.
 
Manufacturing. Pursuant to current law, dietary supplements are manufactured using food GMPs, which stands for good manufacturing practices. DSHEA empowered the FDA to issue specialized GMPs for dietary supplements, but several years passed before the FDA took the next step in the rule-making process. On March 13, 2003, the FDA published a proposed rule in the Federal Register which proposed comprehensive GMPs for supplements and dietary ingredients. The FDA accepted public comments on the proposed GMPs until June 11, 2003; final GMPs for supplements will be promulgated after the FDA has reviewed the public comments. Once final GMP regulations become effective, our manufacturer will be required to adhere to them. The FDA will most likely institute an effective date for the GMPs which will allow our manufacturer a reasonable amount of time to conduct this review and, if necessary, revise its manufacturing operations to comply with the final GMP regulations. Typically, the effective date for new manufacturing and labeling regulations is 12 months after the promulgation of the final rule or new regulation. As of March 2, 2006, the FDA had not yet published this final rule on GMPs, but it is promised and expected in the next few months.
 
Advertising and Website. The FDA considers website promotional content to constitute “labeling”, and thus our website must not contain disease claims or drug claims, but only permissible structure/function claims. The FTC governs the advertising of dietary supplements, in any medium or vehicle—print ads, radio spots, infomercials, etc., including Internet ads and websites. The fundamental FTC rule is that all material advertising claims, whether express (direct) or implied, must be substantiated by reliable and competent scientific evidence. Because our website must comply with both FDA and FTC regulations, we routinely ask our regulatory compliance counsel to review certain web pages, especially the content of new product promotions. When necessary, our regulatory counsel also reviews the scientific substantiation for particular claims (again, especially for newer products such as Prime One, an anti-stress and weight loss product) to determine if it is sufficient, and also that there are no disease claims present, the main FDA issue.
 
We also require associate websites to be in compliance with FDA and FTC regulations. As such, and to ensure Internet compliance, associates may only copy or link to our corporate website. Any independent websites are absolutely unauthorized, and their creators are solely liable for defending any regulatory enforcement actions. Violation of this policy may result in termination by us. This policy was explicitly conveyed to all associates via a formal letter/ notice, prepared in 2004 by our Chief Financial Officer (CFO) and our regulatory counsel, and signed by our CFO.

In markets outside the United States, prior to commencing operations or marketing products, we may be required to obtain approvals, licenses, or certifications from a country’s ministry of health or comparable agency.  Approvals or licensing may be conditioned on reformulation of our products for the market or may be unavailable with respect to certain products or product ingredients. We must also comply with local product labeling and packaging regulations that vary from country to country.  Foreign regulatory requirements have not placed a significant burden on our ability to operate in current foreign countries.

 
 
FDA Actions and Updates in 2005. The entire year of 2005 has been a very busy, political, and turbulent year for the FDA, notably with the confirmation and then the sudden resignation of Commissioner Lester Crawford. Other significant events concerned:

 
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Controversy over the Plan B birth control pill, including the OTC version
 
 
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Withdrawal from the market of Vioxx and other Cox-2 inhibitor drugs
 
 
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Consequently, a renewed urging from Congress to install an independent agency, separate from the FDA’s drug approval division (CDER), for the post-market monitoring of drug safety
 
 
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Concern regarding the possible spread of avian flu to human to human contagion and the beginning of a pandemic, combined with insufficient or unreliable prevention and treatment
 
 
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Continued emphasis on food safety, and counter-bioterrorism

Thus, the compliance spotlight has not been on dietary supplements in 2005. Nevertheless, we have seen an overall increase in FDA inspections of supplement facilities (both manufacturing and distributors), an increase in detention actions on supplement shipments, and more rigorous and more numerous Warning Letters sent to manufacturers and suppliers regarding supplements being marketed with disease claims and/or drug claims, especially via Internet promotions.

Product Claims and Advertising. Advertising of products is subject to regulation by the FTC under the FTC Act. Section 5 of the FTC Act prohibits unfair methods of competition and unfair or deceptive acts or practices in or affecting commerce.  Section 12 of the FTC Act provides that the dissemination of, or causing to be disseminated, any false advertisement pertaining to drugs or foods, which would include dietary supplements, is an unfair or deceptive act or practice.  Under the FTC’s Substantiation Doctrine, an advertiser is required to have a “reasonable basis” for all objective product claims before the claims are made.  Failure to adequately substantiate claims may be considered either deceptive or unfair practices.  Pursuant to this FTC requirement, we are required to have adequate substantiation for all material advertising claims made for our products.
 
In recent years, the FTC has initiated numerous investigations of and actions against dietary supplement, weight management, and cosmetic products and companies.  The FTC issued a guidance document (in November 1998, but still current) to assist companies in understanding and complying with the substantiation requirement for advertising claims for supplements.  We have organized the documentation supporting and substantiating our advertising and promotional practices in compliance with these guidelines. Neither we nor our products have ever been the target of an FTC investigation. Our Director of Marketing works closely with our regulatory counsel to assure the proper level of substantiation of all advertising claims, regardless of vehicle or medium, e.g., TV commercial, website, or testimonial, etc.
 
Moreover, the FTC has joint jurisdiction with the FDA over supplements: the FDA focuses on the manufacturing and labeling, while the FTC focuses on advertising, including infomercials and testimonials. In particular, in 2005 the FTC has been especially active, using this overlapping and joint jurisdiction with the FDA in its combined agency enforcement mechanism called “Cyber Stings”--via the FTC’s monitoring of supplement claims found on Internet advertising, (beginning about five years ago) a relentless program termed Operation Cure.all. With this Internet surveillance, both agencies search promotional websites, the FTC tracking down deceptive claims, and the FDA monitoring for drug or disease claims. For example, two or three months ago, these two federal agencies issued a joint notice condemning and forbidding herbal products and dietary supplements generally marketed to “treat” avian flu.
 
When the FTC finds compliance violations, the FDA then sends out Warning Letters regarding these Internet claims, called “Cyber Letters”. In particular, as to diet products, the FTC in 2004 issued specific new guidelines for permissible weight loss claims, prohibiting claims that the Commission considers to be “infeasible”, or unable to be supported by current science. Our regulatory counsel keeps us fully apprised of all such new guidelines and regulations, via compliance updates sent twice per month.
 
In addition to the focus on supplements claiming to treat serious diseases such as cancer, these federal agencies keep a vigilant eye on false and misleading weight loss claims. The FTC, under its “Big Fat Lie” initiative, has flagged and prosecuted certain claims as “infeasible” under current science, e.g., permanent weight loss with no diet or exercise. In an action that may be pertinent to us, the FTC in early 2005 objected to some weight loss claims
 


involving lessening stress and the hormone cortisol, including an enforcement action against the formulator and marketers of CortiSlim. We are watching such enforcement actions closely, to determine the FTC’s parameters regarding such stress and weight claims, which would affect some of our newer products.
 
In an enforcement action in early June, 2005, the FTC cited numerous companies making anti-aging claims that seemed too good to be true, such as, “Turn back the clock”. We observe that all of these companies were marketing Human Growth Hormone (HGH) products, or supplements containing precursors to HGH—which is not contained in any of our products. Nonetheless, this massive initiative and other FTC actions shows that the Commission’s newest focus (after weight loss claims) will be youth and anti-aging claims. We do market certain dietary supplements in this arena, making claims such as “reduces oxidative stress” and “neutralizes free radicals”. Thus, we have asked our regulatory attorney to review and monitor such claims, in light of the FTC’s current policy.
 
To determine whether certain claims are deceptive, the FTC is authorized to initiate comprehensive investigations. The FTC may enforce compliance with the law in a variety of ways, both administratively and judicially, using compulsory process, cease and desist orders, and injunctions.  FTC enforcement can result in orders requiring, among other things, limits on advertising, corrective advertising, disgorgement of profits, consumer redress, divestiture of assets, rescission of contracts, and such other relief as the agency deems necessary to protect the public.  Most FTC deceptive advertising cases are resolved with Settlement Orders, often including consumer redress (i.e., monetary payments which can measure in the millions), and injunction-like provisions forbidding misrepresentations and requiring “competent and reliable scientific evidence” (and sometimes disclaimers) for all future claims. Violation of these orders could result in substantial financial or other penalties.  We have not been notified that we have been, or are the subject of, any enforcement action by the FTC, but such action in the future by the FTC could materially adversely affect our ability to successfully market our products. That is why we pay careful attention to new guidelines and recent investigations launched, complaints filed, and fines imposed by the FTC, as shown above.
 
One New Product. In the past year we have formulated and marketed one new product: a pomegranate-based liquid, with adaptogens and CoQ10 included, called Prime Delight, which is labeled and promoted as a dietary supplement. Our regulatory counsel has reviewed its label, claims, and advertising campaign. It has been on the market since September 2005. We are currently revising the Prime Delight brochure and website. We have not launched any new ad campaigns or themes for existing products.

Compliance Efforts. We attempt to remain in full compliance with all applicable laws and regulations governing the manufacture, labeling, sale, distribution and advertising of our dietary supplements. We retain special legal counsel for advice on both FDA and FTC legal issues. In particular, we work closely with regulatory compliance legal counsel who specializes in DSHEA regulations for label revisions, content of structure/function statements, advertising copy, website content—and, in particular, the position of the FDA on stimulant-containing products, and the position of the FTC on marketing “anti-aging” supplements. During 2005, we have received no compliance enforcement letters or correspondence of any sort from the FDA or FTC, or from any state regulatory agency or department. Nor have our facilities been the object of any inspections or audits.

Network Marketing System. Laws and regulations in each country in which we operate prevent the use of deceptive or fraudulent practices that have sometimes been inappropriately associated with legitimate direct selling and network marketing activities. These laws include anti-pyramiding, securities, lottery, referral selling, anti-fraud and business opportunity statutes, regulations and court cases. Illegal schemes, typically referred to as “pyramid”, “chain distribution”, or “endless chain” schemes, compensate participants primarily or solely for the introduction or enrollment of additional participants into the scheme.  Often these schemes are characterized by large up-front entry or sign-up fees, over-priced products of low value, little or no emphasis on the sale or use of products, high-pressure recruiting tactics, and claims of huge and quick financial rewards requiring little or no effort.  Generally these laws are directed at ensuring that product sales ultimately are made to consumers and that advancement within sales organizations is based on sales of the enterprise’s products, rather than investments in the organizations or other non-retail sales related criteria or activity.  Where required by law, we obtain regulatory approval of our network marketing system, or, where approval is not required or available, the favorable opinion of local counsel as to regulatory compliance.
 
We currently have independent associates in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and Canada. In addition to federal regulation in the United States, each state has enacted its own “Little FTC Act” to regulate sales and advertising.  Occasionally, we receive requests to supply information regarding our network marketing plan to regulatory agencies. Although we have from time to time modified our network marketing system to comply with interpretations of various regulatory authorities, we believe that our network marketing program is in compliance with laws and regulations relating to network marketing activities in our current markets.  Nevertheless, we remain subject to the risk that, in one or more of our present or future markets, the marketing system or the conduct of certain

 
associates could be found not to be in compliance with applicable laws and regulations.  Failure by an associate or us to comply with these laws and regulations could have a material adverse effect on our business in a particular market or in general.  Any or all of these factors could adversely affect the way we do business and could affect our ability to attract potential associates or enter new markets.  In the United States, the FTC has been active in its enforcement efforts against both pyramid schemes and legitimate network marketing organizations with certain legally problematic components, having instituted several enforcement actions resulting in signed settlement agreements and payment of large fines.  Although to our knowledge, we have not been the target of an FTC investigation, there can be no assurance that the FTC will not investigate us in the future. Noncompliance with applicable laws and regulations could:
 
 
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Result in enforcement action and imposition of penalties;

 
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Require modification of our network marketing system;

 
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Result in negative publicity; or

 
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Have a negative effect on associate morale and loyalty.

Any of these consequences could have a material adverse effect on our sales as well as our financial condition.

We cannot predict the nature of any future law, regulation, interpretation, or application, nor can we predict what effect additional governmental legislation or regulations, judicial decisions, or administrative orders, when and if promulgated, would have on our business in the future.  It is possible that future developments may require that we revise our network marketing program.  Any or all of these requirements could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, and financial condition.

We are subject to the risk of challenges to the legality of our network marketing system by our associates, both individually and as a class. Generally such challenges would be based on claims that our network marketing system was operated as an illegal “pyramid scheme” in violation of federal and state securities laws, state unfair practice and fraud laws and the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act.

Two important Federal Trade Commission cases have established legal precedent for determining whether a network marketing system constitutes an illegal pyramid scheme. The first, IN RE KOSCOT INTERPLANETARY, INC., 86 F.T.C. 1106 (1975), set forth a standard for determining whether a marketing system constituted a pyramid scheme. Under the KOSCOT standard, a pyramid scheme is characterized by the participants' payment of money to a company in return for:

 
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The right to sell a product; and

 
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The right to receive, in return for recruiting other participants into the program, rewards that are unrelated to sales of the product to ultimate users.

Applying the KOSCOT standard in IN RE AMWAY CORP., 93 F.T.C. 618 (1979), the FTC determined that a company will not be classified as operating a pyramid scheme if the company adopts and enforces policies that in fact encourage retail sales to consumers and prevent “inventory loading”. Inventory loading occurs when associates purchase large quantities of non-returnable inventory to obtain the full amount of compensation available under the system. In AMWAY, the FTC found that the marketing system of Amway Corporation did not constitute a pyramid scheme, noting the following Amway policies:

 
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Participants were required to buy back, from any person they recruited, any salable, unsold inventory upon the recruit leaving Amway;

 
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Every participant was required to sell at wholesale or retail at least 70% of the products bought in a given month in order to receive a bonus for that month; and

 
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In order to receive a bonus in a month, each participant was required to submit proof of retail sales made to 10 different consumers.

We believe that our network marketing system is not classified as a pyramid scheme under the standards set forth in KOSCOT, AMWAY, and other applicable law. In particular, in most jurisdictions, we maintain an inventory buy-back program to address the problem of inventory loading. Pursuant to this program, we repurchase products sold to an associate (subject to a 10% restocking charge) provided that the associate:



 
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Resigns; and

 
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Returns the product in marketable condition within 12 months of original purchase, or longer where required by applicable state law or regulations.

 Our literature provided to associates describes our buy-back program. In addition, pursuant to agreements with our associates, each associate represents that at least 70% of the products he or she buys will be sold to non-associates. However, as is the case with other network marketing companies, the bonuses paid by us to our associates are based on product purchases including purchases of products that are personally consumed by the downline associates. Basing bonuses on sales of personally consumed products may be considered an inventory loading purchase. Furthermore, associates' bonuses are based on the wholesale prices received by us on product purchases or, in some cases based upon the particular product purchased, on prices less than the wholesale prices.

In the event of challenges to the legality of our network marketing system by associates, we would be required to:

 
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Demonstrate that our network marketing policies are enforced; and

 
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That the network marketing system and associates' compensation thereunder serve as safeguards to deter inventory loading and encourage retail sales to the ultimate consumers.

In WEBSTER V. OMNITRITION INTERNATIONAL, INC., 79 F.3d 776 (9th Cir. 1996), the United States Court of Appeals held that a class action brought against Omnitrition International, Inc., a multilevel marketing seller of nutritional supplements and skin care products, should be allowed to proceed to trial. The plaintiffs, former associates of Omnitrition's products, alleged that Omnitrition's selling program was an illegal pyramid scheme and claimed violations of Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act and several federal and state fraud and securities laws. Despite evidence that Omnitrition complied with the AMWAY standards, the court ruled that a jury would have to decide whether Omnitrition's policies, many of which apparently were similar to compliance policies adopted by us, were adequate to ensure that Omnitrition's marketing efforts resulted in a legitimate product marketing and distribution structure and not an illegal pyramid scheme. We believe that our marketing and sales programs differ in significant respects from those of Omnitrition, and that our marketing program complies with applicable law. The two most significant differences are:

 
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The Omnitrition marketing plan required associates to purchase $2,000 in merchandise in order to qualify for bonuses as compared to $22 on autoship under our marketing program; and

 
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The Omnitrition inventory repurchase policy was limited to products that were less than three months old as compared to one year under our inventory repurchase policy.

 
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Lessons from the OMNITRITION case are that:

 
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A selling program which operates to generate only the minimum purchases necessary to qualify for bonuses is suspect; and

 
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A selling program must operate to generate purchases independently of the payment of bonuses in order to have a legitimate product marketing and distribution structure.

We believe that our selling program operates to generate significant purchases for “intrinsic value” as demonstrated by our sales figures. During the month of December 2005, 9,888 of our associates placed a total of 12,097 orders averaging $61 in size, while only a single $22 on autoship per month is necessary to qualify for bonuses. In view of the holding of the court of appeals in the OMNITRITION case, however, there is no assurance that, if challenged, we would prevail against private plaintiffs alleging violations of anti-pyramid and securities laws. A final ruling against us in such a suit could result in the imposition of a material liability against us. Moreover, even if we were successful in defending against such suit, the costs of such defense, both in dollars spent and in management time, could be material and adversely affect our operating results. In addition, the negative publicity of such a suit could adversely affect our sales and ability to attract and retain associates.

Nutrition for Life International, Inc., one of our competitors and a multilevel seller of personal care and nutritional supplements, announced in January 1997 that it had settled class action litigation brought by associates alleging fraud in connection with the operation of a pyramid scheme. Nutrition for Life paid in excess of $3 million to settle claims brought on behalf of its associates, and related securities fraud claims brought on behalf of certain purchasers of its stock.



We believe that our marketing program is significantly different from the program allegedly promoted by Nutrition for Life and that our marketing program is not in violation of anti-pyramid laws or regulations. Two issues in the Nutrition for Life matter were: (1) a $1,000 buy-in urged on new recruits, and (2) the paying of commissions on product vouchers prior to the actual delivery of product. By design, our marketing program offers no incentive to anyone to make a large personal purchase, nor do we use product vouchers. Actual average order size in December 2005 was $61. As stated before, there is no assurance that claims similar to the claims brought against Nutrition for Life and other multilevel marketing organizations will not be brought against us, or that we will prevail in the event any such claims were made.

Intellectual Property

Trademarks. We have developed and use registered trademarks in our business, particularly relating to the corporate and product names.  We use several trademarks and trade names in connection with our marketing products and operations. As of December 31, 2005, we had 28 federal trademark registrations with the United States Patent and Trademark Office. Federal registration of a trademark enables the registered owner of the mark to bar the unauthorized use of the registered mark in connection with a similar product in the same channels of trade by any third party anywhere in the United States, regardless of whether the registered owner has ever used the trademark in the area where the unauthorized use occurs.  We have filed applications and own trademark registrations, and we intend to register additional trademarks in foreign countries where our products are or may be sold in the future.  Protection afforded registered trademarks in some jurisdictions may not be as extensive as the protection available in the United States.
 
We also claim ownership and protection of certain product names, unregistered trademarks, and service marks under common law.  Common law trademark rights do not provide the same level of protection afforded by registration of a trademark.  In addition, common law trademark rights are limited to the geographic area in which the trademark is actually used.  We believe these trademarks, whether registered or claimed under common law, constitute valuable assets, adding to our recognition and the marketing of our products.  We therefore believe that these proprietary rights have been, and will continue to be, important in enabling us to compete.
 
Trade Secrets. We own certain intellectual property, including trade secrets, which we seek to protect, in part, through confidentiality agreements with employees and other parties, although some employees involved in research and development activities have not entered into these agreements.  Even where these agreements exist, there can be no assurance that these agreements will not be breached, that we would have adequate remedies for any breach, or that our trade secrets will not otherwise become known to, or independently developed by, competitors.  Our proprietary product formulations are generally considered trade secrets, but are not otherwise protected under intellectual property laws.

Competition

The business of developing and distributing nutritional, personal care, and weight management products such as those we sell and distribute is highly competitive.  Numerous manufacturers, distributors, and retailers compete for consumers and, in the case of other network marketing companies, for associates.  We compete directly with other entities that develop, manufacture, market, and distribute products in each of our product lines.  We compete with these entities by emphasizing the underlying science, value, and high quality of our products as well as the convenience and financial benefits afforded by our network marketing system and compensation plan.  However, many of our competitors are substantially larger and have greater financial resources and broader name recognition.  Our markets are highly sensitive to the introduction of new products that may rapidly capture a significant share of those markets.

The nutritional supplement market is characterized by:
 
 
·
Large selections of essentially similar products that are difficult to differentiate;
 
 
·
Retail consumer emphasis on value pricing;
 
 
·
Constantly changing formulations based on evolving scientific research;
 
 
·
Low entry barriers resulting from low brand loyalty, rapid change, widely available manufacturing, low regulatory requirements, and ready access to large distribution channels; and
 
 
·
A lack of uniform standards regarding product ingredient sources, potency, purity, absorption rate, and form.
 


 
 
Similar factors are also characteristic of products comprising our other product lines.  There can be no assurance that we will be able to effectively compete in this intensely competitive environment.  In addition, nutritional, personal care, and weight management products can be purchased in a wide variety of distribution channels, including retail stores.  Our product offerings in each product category are relatively few compared to the wide variety of products offered by many of our competitors, and are often premium priced.  As a result, our ability to remain competitive depends in part upon the successful introduction of new products and enhancements of existing products.
 
We also compete with other network marketing organizations for the time, attention, and commitment of new and current associates.  Our ability to remain competitive depends, in significant part, on our success in recruiting and retaining associates.  We believe that we offer rewarding associate compensation plans and attractive associate benefits and services.  To the extent practicable, our associate compensation plans are designed to be seamless, permitting international expansion without re-qualification or re-entry requirements.  We pay incentives weekly, reducing the time an associate must wait between purchase and sale of products and payment of commissions.  There can be no assurance that our programs for recruiting and retaining associates will be successful.  We also compete for the time, attention, and commitment of this independent associate force.  The pool of individuals interested in the business opportunities presented by network marketing tends to be limited in each market, and is reduced to the extent other network marketing companies successfully recruit these individuals into their businesses.  Although we believe that we offer an attractive opportunity for our associates, there can be no assurance that other network marketing companies will not be able to recruit our existing associates or deplete the pool of potential associates in a given market.
 
We believe that the leading network marketing company in the world, based on total sales, is Amway Corporation and its affiliates, and that Avon Products, Inc. is the leading direct seller of beauty and related products worldwide.  Leading competitors in the nutritional network marketing and nutritional product industry include Herbalife International, Inc., Market America, Inc., Nature’s Sunshine Products, Inc., NBTY, Nu Skin Enterprises, Inc., Twinlab Corporation, and Weider Nutrition.  We believe there are other manufacturers of competing product lines that may launch direct selling enterprises, which will compete with us in certain product lines and for associates.  There can be no assurance that we will be able to successfully meet the challenges posed by this increased competition.

Employees

As of December 31, 2005, we had 38 full-time and six part-time employees, consisting of three executive officers, 13 involved in administrative activities, five involved in marketing activities, 12 involved in customer service and business development activities and five involved in shipping activities. Our employees are not represented by a labor organization. We consider our employee relations to be good.

Availability of Information

We file periodic reports and proxy statements with the Securities and Exchange Commission, or SEC. The public may read and copy any materials we file with the SEC at the SEC’s Public Reference Room at 450 Fifth Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20549. The public may obtain information about the operation of the Public Reference Room by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330. We file our reports with the SEC electronically. The SEC maintains an Internet site that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC. The address of this site is http://www.sec.gov.

Our internet address is www.amsonline.com. We make available on our website, free of charge, copies of our annual report on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K and amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act as soon as reasonably possible after we electronically file such material with, or furnish to, the SEC.

ITEM 2. PROPERTIES

We maintain our executive offices in our state-of-the-art distribution and call center located at 711 NE 39th Street, Oklahoma City, OK 73105. The 23,346 square foot, $1.3 million facility was completely paid for in January 2004. Prior to this, we leased our executive offices on 2601 NW Expressway, Oklahoma City, OK. Those offices are now sub-leased, as they are still under contract through May 31, 2008.



ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
 
The case of Ronald Potter et al v. Advantage Marketing Systems, Inc. et al, a products liability claim, was filed in the Oklahoma County District Court in March 2003. The Plaintiffs allege that the ingestion of ephedra included in AM-300 resulted in the death of Pamela Sue Potter. We have filed an answer to the petition. Written discovery and responses have been exchanged, and a limited number of depositions have been taken. We have denied any wrongdoing and intend to vigorously defend the claim. The amount of damages sought is unknown, but includes compensatory and punitive damages. The loss of this case could have a material adverse effect on the financial condition of the Company.
 
On February 6, 2006, AMS Health Sciences, Inc. and AMS Manufacturing, Inc. filed a lawsuit against Truett McCarty, AMS Health Sciences, Inc. and AMS Manufacturing, Inc. v. Truett McCarty, District Court of Oklahoma County, State of Oklahoma, Case No. CJ-2006-981. We allege that Mr. McCarty defrauded us in the sale of his stock in Heartland Cup, Inc. by failing to disclose the true amount of Heartland Cup, Inc.'s accounts payable. In addition, we allege that this failure was a breach of the stock purchase agreement Mr. McCarty signed. Mr. McCarty has not filed an answer. However, we expect him to do so and to allege a counterclaim against us based upon our decision to withhold further payments to him under a promissory note from Heartland to Mr. McCarty. We deny liability to Mr. McCarty and will vigorously defend any counterclaim.
 
On November 22, 2005, we filed a declaratory judgment action against Vaughn Feather in the Oklahoma County District Court. The case was removed to federal court on December 29, 2005 and is now styled as, AMS Heath Sciences, Inc. v. Vaughn Feather, Western District of Oklahoma, Case no. CIV-05-1522. The action is a request by for a judicial declaration that we are no longer bound to pay royalties to Feather under the terms of the previous Royalty Agreement between us and Feather pursuant to which we were paying royalties for proprietary products and formulas that we believed to no longer be proprietary. We are not seeking damages or any return of previous royalties; however, a favorable outcome would result in an end to our obligation to pay royalties to Feather, which typically exceed $10,000 per month. We are awaiting a ruling on Feather's motion to dismiss the action for lack of personal jurisdiction or to transfer the action to California federal court.

ITEM 4. SUBMISSION OF MATTERS TO A VOTE OF SECURITY HOLDERS

No matters were submitted to a vote of security holders during the fourth quarter of our fiscal year ended December 31, 2005.

PART II

ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED SHAREHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

From November 6, 1997 to June 14, 1999, our common stock was traded on the Nasdaq SmallCap Market under the symbol "AMSO". On June 15, 1999, our common stock began trading on the American Stock Exchange under the symbol "AMM".

On March 27, 2006, the closing sale price of our common stock on the American Stock Exchange was $0.57. We believe there are approximately 1,550 holders of our common stock. The following table sets forth the high and low sale price of our common stock on the American Stock Exchange.
 



       
   
Common Stock Sales Prices
 
   
High
 
Low
 
2005--Calendar Quarter Ended:
             
March 31
 
$
5.75
 
$
2.59
 
June 30
 
$
2.63
 
$
1.64
 
September 30
 
$
2.90
 
$
1.71
 
December 31
 
$
1.59
 
$
0.63
 
2004--Calendar Quarter Ended:
             
March 31
 
$
5.33
 
$
3.66
 
June 30
 
$
6.34
 
$
5.12
 
September 30
 
$
6.50
 
$
2.87
 
December 31
 
$
5.98
 
$
2.66
 

We have never declared or paid cash dividends on our common stock.  We currently intend to retain future earnings, if any, to fund the development and growth of our business.  Future cash dividends, if any, will be determined by the Board of Directors and will be based on earnings, available capital, financial condition, and other factors deemed relevant by the Board of Directors.

Equity Compensation Plan Information

   
(a)
 
(b)
 
(c)
 
Plan Category
 
Number of securities to be issued upon exercise of outstanding options, warrants and rights
 
Weighted-average exercise price of outstanding options, warrants and rights
 
Number of securities remaining available for future issuance under equity compensation plans (excluding securities reflected in column (a))
 
Equity compensation plans approved by security holders
   
1,950,009
 
$
3.58
   
1,174,991
 
Equity compensation plans not approved by security holders
   
---
   
---
   
---
 
Total
   
1,950,009
 
$
3.58
   
1,174,991
 


ITEM 6. MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OR PLAN OF OPERATION

The following discussion should be read in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements and notes thereto under Item 7 below.

General

Since 1996, our business and operations have been significantly affected by the acquisitions of, or acquisitions of the assets of, Miracle Mountain International, Inc., Chambre International, Inc., Stay 'N Shape International, Inc., Solution Products International, Inc., Nation of Winners, Inc., Now International, Inc., ToppMed Inc. and LifeScience Technologies Inc., or LST. Over the years, these acquisitions and asset purchases have added 11,790 associates to our ranks and numerous products to our product line.

On January 4, 2001, we purchased the LST group of companies for $1.2 million and a five year payment of $41,667 per month, or 5% of the gross sales of LST products, whichever is greater. As a result of this acquisition, we added 14 products and over 5,000 associates. We paid the balance of the acquisition note, plus accrued interest, in full on January 29, 2004.

On September 9, 2005, we entered into a definitive Stock Purchase Agreement with Heartland and its principal shareholder for the purchase of all of the principal shareholder’s stock in Heartland. Upon closing of the Stock Purchase Agreement, we acquired 2,000,000 shares, or approximately 83% of the outstanding capital stock of Heartland, for 200,000 shares of our common stock. In addition, we paid approximately $200,000 to acquire the remaining shares of Heartland. Heartland is a manufacturer of foam cups, distributed through a number of contracts.


Heartland has exclusive contracts with the State of Oklahoma and the Department of Defense, as well as a number of restaurants, and one of the large airlines.

As described in Item 3. Legal Proceedings, we have filed suit against Truett McCarty with the District Court of Oklahoma County, State of Oklahoma relating to our acquisition of Heartland. We believe that Mr. McCarty has both defrauded us regarding the financial conditions and results of operations of Heartland, as well as breached certain representations and warranties in the stock purchase agreement relating to the Heartland acquisition. It is our belief that, had we been aware of the true facts and circumstances regarding Heartland’s financial condition and historical results of operations, we would not have purchased Heartland. We presently believe that the dedication of our time and attention to Heartland is neither in our or our stockholders’ best interests. As a result, we expect to either sell Heartland or discontinue its operations by the end of the first quarter, 2006. As such, any further discussion of Heartland and its operations in this report will be limited to the discussions included in our audited financial statements, Item 2. Properties, Item 3. Legal Proceedings, and Item 6. Management’s Discussion and Analysis or Plan of Operation. We have not yet formalized a plan to discontinue the Heartland operations. As such, our consolidated financial statements do not reflect Heartland as a discontinued operation. Similarly, since no plan of discontinued operation is in place, we cannot determine what the ultimate impact of the sale or discontinuation of the Heartland operations will have on our financial condition or results of operations.

Critical Accounting Policies. We prepare our consolidated financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States, which require us to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosures of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the year. Actual results could differ from those estimates. We consider the following policies to be most critical in understanding the judgments that are involved in preparing our financial statements and the uncertainties that could impact our results of operations, financial condition and cash flows.

Throughout this report, “net sales” represents the gross sales amounts reflected on our invoices, less discounts and sales returns. All of our marketing products include a customer satisfaction guarantee. Our marketing products may be returned within 30 days of purchase for a full refund or credit toward the purchase of another product. We also have a buy-back program whereby we repurchase marketing products sold to an independent associate (subject to a restocking fee), provided the associate terminates his/her associateship agreement with us and returns the product within 12 months of original purchase in marketable condition. We receive our net sales price in cash or through credit card payments upon receipt of orders from associates for our marketing sales and in cash or check, not more than 30 days after delivery for our manufacturing sales.

Our “gross profit” consists of net sales less:

 
·
Commissions and bonuses, consisting of commission payments to associates based on their current associate level within their organization, other one-time incentive cash bonuses to qualifying associates, and commission payments to manufacturing sales representives;
 
 
·
Cost of products, consisting of the prices we pay to our manufacturers for marketing products, raw materials, research and development, supplies for the factory, factory employee costs and royalty overrides earned by qualifying associates on sales within their associate organizations; and
 
 
·
Cost of shipping, consisting of costs related to shipments, duties and tariffs, freight expenses relating to shipment of products to associates or manufacturing customers and similar expenses.

We recognize marketing revenue upon shipment of products, training aids and promotional material to our independent associates. All of our marketing customers pay for sales in advance of shipment. As such, we have no trade receivables. We used to make loans to associates, which were repayable in five years or less, and which were secured by commissions controlled by us. Associate loans are no longer allowed. Interest rates on loans were typically two percent or more above the Prime rate and were fixed. All loans are secured by commission payment sources that are within our control, but subject to increases and decreases depending upon associate sales activity. Management determined that there was a possibility of default on the associate loans. At December 31, 2005, we reserved $147,491 as an allowance for doubtful accounts in connection with the associate loans. Total associate loans still outstanding at December 31, 2005 totaled $212,159. We recognize manufacturing revenue upon shipment of goods to our customers. Products are sold on varying terms, the most common being net 30 days, creating trade receivables.

In July 2001, the Financial Accounting Standards Board issued Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 142, “Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets”. This standard requires companies to stop amortizing existing goodwill and intangible assets with indefinite lives effective January 1, 2002. Under the new rules, companies would


only adjust the carrying amount of goodwill or indefinite life intangible assets upon an impairment of the goodwill or indefinite life intangible assets. Our intangible assets consist of non-compete covenants and other intangibles, which have a significant residual value. These intangible assets are being amortized over the life of the contracts. We evaluate all intangible assets annually for indicators of impairment.

We use an asset and liability approach to account for income taxes. Deferred income taxes are recognized for the tax consequences of temporary differences and carryforwards by applying enacted tax rates applicable to future years to differences between the financial statement amounts and the tax bases of existing assets and liabilities. A valuation allowance is established if, in management's opinion, it is more likely than not that some portion of the deferred tax asset will not be realized. All evidence, both positive and negative, is considered to determine whether a valuation allowance is needed for some or all of a deferred tax asset. Judgment must be used in considering the relative impact of negative and positive evidence. The more negative evidence that exists, (a) the more positive evidence is necessary and (b) the more difficult it is to support a conclusion that a valuation allowance is not needed. At December 31, 2005, our deferred tax asset was approximately $5,300,000. Based on the above factors and management’s evaluation, we determined that a valuation allowance should be established for the entire deferred tax asset.

We write down our inventory to provide for estimated obsolete or unsalable inventory based on assumptions about future demand for our products and market conditions. If future demand and market conditions are less
favorable than management’s assumptions, additional inventory write-downs could be required. Likewise, favorable future demand and market conditions could positively impact future operating results if written-off inventory is sold. At December 31, 2005, we established a marketing inventory obsolescence reserve of approximately $86,000 for estimated obsolete or unsalable inventory. We believe all manufacturing inventory can be sold and is not subject to spoilage, obsolescence, etc., and as such, at December 31, 2005, there is no manufacturing inventory reserve.

We account for contingencies in accordance with SFAS No. 5, “Accounting for Contingencies”. SFAS 5 requires that we record an estimated loss from a loss contingency when information available prior to issuance of our financial statements indicates that it is probable than an asset has been impaired or a liability has been incurred at the date of the financial statements, and the amount of the loss can be reasonable estimated. Accounting for contingencies such as legal and income tax matters requires us to use our judgment. Many legal and tax contingencies can take years to resolve. Generally, as the time period increases over which the uncertainties are resolved, the likelihood of changes to the estimate of the ultimate outcome increases. However, an adverse outcome in these matters could have a material impact on our results of operations, financial condition and cash flows.

Warrant Exercises and Redemptions. On December 10, 2003 we announced the redemption of all outstanding redeemable stock purchase warrants and the underwriter warrants not exercised by January 16, 2004. Rather than have their warrants redeemed, substantially all of the holders of the redeemable stock purchase warrants and the underwriter warrants exercised their warrants on or before the redemption date. Proceeds from the redeemable stock purchase warrants and the underwriter warrant redemption totaled $5,394,615, including $2,112,734 in 2003 and $3,281,881 in 2004, and payment for unexercised warrants was $11,870.

On December 10, 2003, we announced the redemption of all outstanding 1997-A warrants not exercised by January 16, 2004. Rather than have their warrants redeemed, substantially all of the holders of the 1997-A warrants exercised their warrants on or before the redemption date. Proceeds from the 1997-A warrant redemption totaled $714,877, including $18,540 in 2003 and $696,337 in 2004, and payment for unexercised warrants was $25.
 
In January 2004, we issued 1,170,064 shares of common stock upon exercise of the redeemable stock purchase warrants, the underwriter warrants and the 1997-A warrants.

Results of Operations

The following table sets forth, as a percentage of net sales, selected consolidated results of our operations for the years ended December 31, 2005, 2004 and 2003. The selected consolidated results of operations are derived from our audited consolidated financial statements. The results of operations for the periods presented are not necessarily indicative of our future operations.



   
For the Years Ended December 31,
 
   
2005
 
2004
 
2003
 
   
Amount
 
Percent
 
Amount
 
Percent
 
Amount
 
Percent
 
Net sales
 
$
13,701,324
   
100.0
%
$
18,203,497
   
100.0
%
$
18,486,178
   
100.0
%
Cost of sales:
                                     
Commissions and bonuses
   
5,234,414
   
38.2
   
8,470,653
   
46.5
   
7,797,448
   
42.2
 
Cost of products
   
3,783,130
   
27.6
   
4,154,968
   
22.8
   
3,423,006
   
18.5
 
Cost of shipping
   
1,418,512
   
10.4
   
1,962,900
   
10.8
   
1,529,882
   
8.3
 
Total cost of sales
   
10,436,056
   
76.2
   
14,588,521
   
80.1
   
12,750,336
   
69.0
 
Gross profit
   
3,265,268
   
23.8
   
3,614,976
   
19.9
   
5,735,842
   
31.0
 
Marketing, distribution and
                                     
administrative expenses:
                                     
Marketing
   
1,169,768
   
8.5
   
1,536,777
   
8.4
   
1,538,981
   
8.3
 
Distribution and administrative
   
5,972,700
   
43.6
   
6,684,801
   
36.7
   
7,124,894
   
38.5
 
Total marketing, distribution and
                                     
administrative expenses
   
7,142,468
   
52.1
   
8,221,578
   
45.2
   
8,663,875
   
46.9
 
Loss from operations
   
(3,877,200
)
 
(28.3
)
 
(4,606,602
)
 
(25.3
)
 
(2,928,033
)
 
(15.8
)
Other income (expense):
                                     
Interest and dividends, net
   
(3,159
)
 
(0.0
)
 
162,161
   
0.9
   
(74,704
)
 
(0.4
)
Other income (expenses
   
147,111
   
1.0
   
113,236
   
0.6
   
(156,963
)
 
(0.8
)
Total other income (expense
   
143,952
   
1.0
   
275,397
   
1.5
   
(231,667
)
 
(1.3
)
Loss before income taxes
   
(3,733,248
)
 
(27.3
)
 
(4,331,205
)
 
(23.8
)
 
(3,159,700
)
 
(17.1
)
Income tax
   
32,835
   
0.2
   
1,936,262
   
10.6
   
(590,839
)
 
(3.2
)
Net loss
 
$
(3,766,083
)
 
(27.5)%
$
(6,267,467
)
 
(34.4)%
$
(2,568,861
)
 
(13.9)%

Comparison of 2005 and 2004

Our net sales during the year ended December 31, 2005, decreased by $4,502,173, or 24.7%, to $13,701,324 from $18,203,497 during the year ended December 31, 2004. At December 31, 2005, we had approximately 15,000 “active” associates compared to approximately 55,000 at December 31, 2004. An associate is considered to be “active” if he or she has made a product purchase of $50 or more from us or is enrolled in our autoship program within the previous 90 days. On April 5, 2005, we announced that we were ending the free trial program due to the lack of retention required to make the program profitable long term. In connection with the reduction in sales, on April 20, 2005, we announced the implementation of expense reductions designed to better align expenses with revenue. Due to the continued decrease in sales we implemented additional expense reductions and employee layoffs in August and December. Manufacturing revenues accounted for $1,094,999, or 8.0%, of 2005 sales.

Our cost of sales during 2005 decreased by $4,152,465, or 28.5%, to $10,436,056 from $14,588,521 during 2004. Total cost of sales, as a percentage of net sales, decreased to 76.2% in 2005 from 80.1% during 2004. The decrease in cost of sales was attributable to:

 
·
a decrease of approximately $3,236,000 in associate commissions and bonuses due to the cessation of our free trial program and lower sales volume;

 
·
a decrease of approximately $372,000 in the cost of products sold due to the cessation of our free trial program and lower sales volume, offset by approximately $892,000 cost of products from our manufacturing operations; and

 
·
a decrease of approximately $544,000 in shipping costs primarily due to cessation of our free trial program and lower sales volume.

Our manufacturing cost of sales represented $919,207, or 8.8%, of our total cost of sales. Marketing cost of sales as a percentage of net marketing sales was 75.5% and manufacturing cost of sales as a percentage of net manufacturing sales was 83.9%.

The factors discussed above resulted in a decrease in gross profit of $349,708, or 9.7%, to $3,265,268 during 2005 from $3,614,976 during 2004.

Marketing expenses decreased 367,009, or 23.9%, to $1,169,768 during the year ended December 31, 2005, from $1,536,777 during the same period in 2004. The decrease in expense was primarily attributable to a decrease in promotion expense of approximately $385,000.



Distribution and administrative expenses decreased $712,101, or 10.7%, to $5,972,700 during the year ended December 31, 2005, from $6,684,801 during the same period in 2004. This decrease was primarily attributable to:

 
·
a decrease in staffing and related payroll cost of approximately $483,000;

 
·
a decrease in professional services of approximately $346,000 related to legal expense, consulting expense and temporary employees;

 
·
a decrease in rent expense of approximately $339,000 related to the recording of a lease abandonment accrual in 2004;

 
·
a decrease in vehicle and equipment expense of approximately $119,000 related primarily to lower repair and maintenance costs;

 
·
a decrease in depreciation and amortization of approximately $106,000 related to the sale of various assets in 2004 and early 2005; and

 
·
a decrease in administrative expense of approximately $248,000 primarily due to lower bank service charges, employee relations expenses and sales tax expenses.

These decreases were partially offset by:

 
·
an increase in bad debt expense of approximately $175,000 related to the reserves for doubtful accounts related to accounts and notes receivable;
     
 
·
an increase in shareholder relations of approximately $48,000; and

 
·
administrative expenses from our manufacturing operations of approximately $698,000, consisting primarily of approximately $170,000 in employee costs and approximately $379,000 in utility expense.

The marketing, distribution and administrative expenses as a percentage of net sales increased to 52.1% in 2005, from 45.2% in 2004. Marketing, distribution and administrative expense as a percentage of net sales for our manufacturing operations were 66.3%.

Our other income (reduced by other expense) decreased by $131,445 to net other income of $143,952 during 2005, from net other income of $275,397 during the same period in 2004. This decrease was primarily attributable to:

·  a decrease in investment income of approximately $75,000 related to marketable securities;

 
·
a decrease in gain on sale of marketable securities of approximately $11,000 related to the sales of marketable securities in 2005; and

 
·
net other expense of approximately $62,000 related to our manufacturing operations.

Our loss before taxes decreased $597,957, or 13.8%, to $3,733,248 during 2005, from $4,331,205 during 2004. Loss before taxes as a percentage of net sales was 27.2% and 23.8% during 2005 and 2004. Income tax expense during 2005 and 2004 was $32,835 and $1,936,262. Our net loss decreased $2,501,384, to a net loss of $3,766,083 during 2005, from a net loss of $6,267,467 during 2004. This decrease in net loss was attributable to:

 
·
The decrease in marketing, distribution and administrative expense to $7,142,468 during 2005 from $8,221,578 during 2004; and

 
·
The decrease in tax expense of approximately $3,400,000 due to the write off of the deferred tax asset in 2004.

Net loss from our manufacturing operations accounted for $611,807, or 16.2% of our total loss.

Net loss as a percentage of net sales decreased to 27.5% during 2005, from 34.4% during 2004, due to the factors discussed above.



Comparison of 2004 and 2003

Our net sales during the year ended December 31, 2004, decreased by $282,681, or 1.5%, to $18,203,497 from $18,486,178 during the year ended December 31, 2003. During 2004, we made sales to approximately 99,000 associates, compared to sales during 2003 to approximately 44,000 associates. The aggregate number of associates at December 31, 2004 increased from 2003 due to increased recruiting activity and sales of our free trial program. At December 31, 2004, we had approximately 55,000 "active" associates compared to approximately 19,000 at December 31, 2003. An associate is considered to be "active" if he or she has made a product purchase of $50 or more from us or is enrolled in our autoship program within the previous 90 days. Sales per associate per month decreased to $55 for 2004, compared to $61 for 2003. We have historically earned a material portion of our revenues from our AM-300 product, which contains ephedra. In 2003, the FDA banned the use of ephedra in nutritional supplements. This ban was effective April 12, 2004. Sales of our AM-300 product totaled approximately $1.7 million in 2004, as compared to sales of approximately $6.5 million in 2003. Over the last several years, through strategic acquisitions, product redevelopment and refocus of weight loss products, we have built a multi-product peak performance, weight loss and nutritional product line that is non-ephedra. We have seen positive results in converting our AM-300 customers to AM-300 Ephedra Free or other weight loss products.
 
During 2004, we added approximately 75,000 new sales associates and preferred customers with our free trial program. This compares to additions of approximately 12,000 new sales associates for the prior year.

Our cost of sales during 2004 increased by $1,838,185, or 14.4%, to $14,588,521 from $12,750,336 during 2003. This increase was attributable to sales of our free trial program, resulting in:

 
·
An increase of approximately $673,000 in associate commissions and bonuses;
 
 
·
An increase of approximately $732,000 in the cost of products sold; and

 
·
An increase of approximately $433,000 in shipping costs.

Total cost of sales as a percentage of net sales increased to 80.1% during the year ended December 31, 2004, from 69.0% during the same period in 2003. This was due to an increase in cost of products to 22.8% of net sales from 18.5%, an increase in cost of shipping to 10.8% of net sales from 8.3% and an increase in commissions and bonuses to 46.5% of net sales from 42.1%, all resulting from sales of our free trial program.

Our gross profit decreased $2,120,866, or 37.0%, to $3,614,976 during 2004 from $5,735,842 during 2003. The gross profit decreased as a percentage of net sales to 19.9% in 2004 from 31.0% in 2003, as reflected in our cost of goods sold increase as a percentage of net sales.

Marketing expense was virtually flat at $1,536,777 during 2004, compared to $1,538,981 during 2003.

Distribution and administrative expense decreased $440,093, or 6.2%, to $6,684,801 during 2004 compared to $7,124,894 in 2003. The decrease in expense was primarily attributable to:

 
·
An decrease in employee costs of approximately $670,000 due to the 2003 accrual of deferred compensation;
 
 
·
An decrease in shareholder relations of approximately $108,000 related to the redemption of our warrants in 2003; and
 
 
·
A decrease in depreciation expense of approximately $123,000 due to asset sales during the year.
 
The decrease in distribution and administrative expenses was partially offset by:

 
·
An increase in employee costs of approximately $180,000 related to increase in personnel expense and benefits;
 
 
·
An increase in professional fees of approximately $183,000 due to legal fees related to ephedra lawsuits and consulting fees related to internal control documentation and testing; and
 
 
·
An increase in rent expense of approximately $182,000 related to the lease abandonment accrual for our previous corporate offices.



The marketing, distribution and administrative expenses as a percentage of net sales decreased to 45.2% in 2004, from 46.9% in 2003.

Our net other income (reduced by other expense) increased $507,064 to net other income of $275,397 during 2004, from a net other expense of $231,667 during the same period in 2003. This increase was primarily due to:

 
·
An increase in investment income of approximately $80,000 related to marketable securities;
 
 
·
A decrease in interest expense of approximately $160,000 due to the extinguishment of debt;
 
 
·
A decrease in loss on sale of assets of approximately $92,000; and
 
 
·
A gain on sale of marketable securities of $143,000.

Our loss before taxes increased $1,171,505 to a loss of $4,331,205 during 2004, from a loss of $3,159,700 during 2003. Loss before taxes as a percentage of net sales was 23.8% and 17.1% during 2004 and 2003. Income tax expense (benefit) during 2004 and 2003 was $1,936,262 and $(590,839). Our net loss increased $3,698,606, to a net loss of $6,267,467 during 2004, from a net loss of $2,568,861 during 2003. This increase in net loss was attributable to:

 
·
The decrease in gross profit to $3,614,976 during 2004 from $5,735,842 during 2003; and

 
·
The write off of the deferred tax asset in 2004 of approximately $3,400,000, partially offset by:
 
 
·
The decrease in marketing, distribution and administrative expense to $8,221,578 during 2004 from $8,663,875 during 2003.

Net loss as a percentage of net sales increased to (34.4%) during 2004, from (13.9%) during 2003.

Seasonality

       No pattern of seasonal fluctuations exists due to the growth patterns that we are currently experiencing. However, there is no assurance that we will not become subject to seasonal fluctuations in operations.

Recently Issued Accounting Standards

In December 2004, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) issued Statement of Financial Accounting Standard (SFAS) No. 123(R), “Share Based Payment”, which revised SFAS No. 123, “Accounting for Stock-Based Compensation”. SFAS No. 123(R) requires entities to measure the fair value of equity share-based payments (stock compensation) at grant date, and recognize the fair value over the period during which an employee is required to provide services in exchange for the equity instrument as a component of the income statement. SFAS No. 123(R) is effective for periods beginning after June 15, 2005. This would require us to adopt FAS 123(R) effective January 1, 2006. We chose an accelerated vesting schedule for the remainder of our options. As of December 31, 2005, all of our outstanding options are fully vested. For the year ended December 31, 2005, there was approximately $580,000 of additional pro forma loss from SFAS No. 123(R).

Commitments and Contingencies

We, like other marketers of products that are intended to be ingested, face an inherent risk of exposure to product liability claims in the event that the use of our products results in injury. We have evaluated the risk associated with consumption of our current products and, based on the indemnification given by our manufacturers and the current product mix, we cancelled our product liability insurance in August 2005. Products containing ephedra, which represented 9.7% of our 2004 net sales, and none of our 2005 sales, were not covered by our product liability insurance. All of our product manufacturers carry product liability insurance, which covers our products. Such product claims against us could adversely affect product sales, results of our operations, financial condition and the value of our common stock.

We are involved in asserted and unasserted claims, which arise in the ordinary course of our business. We routinely evaluate whether a loss is probable, and if so, whether it can be estimated. Estimates are based on similar case law matters, consultation with subject matter experts and information obtained through negotiations with counter-parties. As such, accurately depicting the outcome of pending litigation requires considerable judgment and is subject
 
27

to material differences on final settlement. Accruals for probable losses are recorded in accrued expenses. If our assessment of the probability is inaccurate, we may need to record additional accruals or reduce recorded accruals later. In addition, we may need to adjust our estimates of the probable loss amounts as further information is obtained or we consider settlements. See “Item 3. Legal Proceedings” for a description of the most significant claims by or against us.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

Our primary source of liquidity has been cash provided by sales of our common stock, marketable securities and operating activities. At December 31, 2005, we had working capital of $37,561 compared to $3,261,919 at December 31, 2004. Our working capital needs over the next 12 months consist primarily of marketing, distribution and administrative expenses, and will be provided by our operating activities and existing cash and cash equivalents. During the year ended December 31, 2005, net cash used in operating activities was $2,555,283, net cash provided by investing activities was $1,286,321, and net cash provided by financing activities was $800,362. We had a net decrease in cash during this period of $468,600.

 The financial statements have been prepared based upon our belief that we will continue as a going concern. Several factors have contributed to our current financial condition:

 
·
The impact of several material non-recurring events, including the one-time impairment of goodwill, the accrual of deferred compensation related to the employment contract of our founder and then CEO, the implementation of a free trial program, the write off of our deferred tax asset, and a lease abandonment charge related to the abandonment of the executive offices;
 
 
·
Excessive expenses incurred in the Heartland operations, resulting from expenditures over and above what was represented, and a continuing excess of monthly operating expenses over revenues; and
 
 
·
Declining net income, due to the FDA’s ban on ephedra products, and the replacement of new products.

We have taken the following steps to significantly reduce our cost of sales and marketing, distribution and administrative costs:

 
·
Reductions in force, encompassing all departments within the Company;
 
 
·
The termination of a discount sales program, designed to give customers a cash discount after purchasing a certain dollar amount of product; and
 
 
·
The termination of several extra employee benefits, including vehicle allowances and social and country-club privileges.

In addition to the above, we have made the decision that, due to poor performance and the strain on the core operations, we will shut down the Heartland operations effective March 31, 2005. This will require a charge for discontinued operations in the first quarter of 2006, however on an ongoing basis, only the service cost of the debt will be incurred. We are also actively working with several investment firms to raise equity capital, not only for equity purposes, but also for cash flow purposes. Finally, we are exploring strategic acquisitions of network marketing companies with profitable, sustained operations.

We are seeing positive upswings and trends in associate recruiting, as well as continued reductions in costs of goods sold and administrative expenses. At December 31, 2005, our ratios compared to net sales are trending toward the levels that existed in our last profitable year, with the exception of marketing, distribution and administrative expenses. As discussed above, we have taken, and continues to take, drastic steps to bring this ratio in line the level that existed in our last profitable year. Finally, we are exploring a new product offering that we believe will be the replacement for the ephedra product banned in 2004.

We believe that without the drain on resources from the Heartland operations, and based on the early results in 2006, we will generate sufficient working capital to sustain operating activities for the next twelve months.

In 2001, we completed construction of a 23,346 square foot distribution and call center facility in Oklahoma City. This project was funded, in part, with bank loans of $980,000 for the land and building and $166,216 for the warehouse equipment. Both loans were with Bank One Oklahoma, N.A. and accrued interest at an annual rate of .25% under the prime rate. The loans were retired in January 2004. As of January 31, 2004, we had no long-term debt outstanding.

 
On September 17, 2004, we purchased additional office and warehouse space for a cash price of $525,000. The building, which is adjacent to our corporate headquarters, provides 6,000 square feet of additional warehouse space and 4,000 additional square feet of office space. In addition, we incurred approximately $221,000 for remodeling the office space and construction of a covered walkway between the two buildings.

On September 9, 2005, we entered into a definitive Stock Purchase Agreement with Heartland and its principal shareholder for the purchase of all of the principal shareholder’s stock in Heartland. Upon closing of the Stock Purchase Agreement, we acquired 2,000,000 shares, or approximately 83% of the outstanding capital stock of Heartland, for 200,000 shares of our common stock. In addition, we paid approximately $200,000 to acquire the remaining shares of Heartland. We assumed approximately $2.1 million in debt from Heartland.

The following summarizes our contractual obligations at December 31, 2005 and the effect such obligations are expected to have on our liquidity and cash flow in future periods.

   
Total
 
Less than 1 Year
 
1 - 3 Years
 
3 - 5 Years
 
Long-term debt
 
$
2,083,369
 
$
523,115
 
$
962,033
 
$
598,221
 
Capital lease obligations
   
174,551
   
89,775
   
73,553
   
11,223
 
Operating leases (1)
   
307,310
   
108,127
   
199,183
   
---
 
Total
 
$
2,565,230
 
$
721,017
 
$
1,234,769
 
$
609,444
 

 
(1)
Includes abandoned lease at the Oil Center.

At December 31, 2005, we had marketable debt and equity securities of $353,608 compared to $2,803,863 at December 31, 2004. Due to the Heartland acquisition, $75,477 of our marketable securities is restricted.

ITEM 7.  FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Our consolidated financial statements are set forth beginning on page F-1 hereof.

ITEM 8. CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENT WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

On June 20, 2005, upon the recommendation of our audit committee and with the approval of our board of directors, we dismissed our principal accountant, Grant Thornton LLP, in order to institute certain cost saving measures. On the same date, we engaged Cole & Reed P.C. as our principal accountant.

At no time did any report by Grant Thornton on our financial statements contain an adverse opinion or a disclaimer of opinion; nor was any such report qualified or modified as to uncertainty, audit scope or accounting principles. Also, at no time did we have any disagreements with Grant Thornton on any matter of accounting principles or practices, financial statement disclosure, or auditing scope or procedure, which disagreements, if not resolved to the satisfaction of Grant Thornton would have caused Grant Thornton to reference the subject matter of the disagreement in connection with their report on our financial statements.

We have not consulted with Cole & Reed during our two most recent fiscal years and any subsequent interim period prior to engaging Cole & Reed regarding either (i) the application of accounting principles to a specified transaction, either completed or proposed, or the type of audit opinion that might be rendered on our financial statements; or (ii) any matter that was either the subject of a disagreement or a reportable event, as those terms are defined in Item 304(a) of Regulation S-K.

ITEM 8A.  CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

As of the end of the period covered by this report, an evaluation was carried out under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rule 13a-15(e) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934) as required by Rule 13a-15(b). Based upon that evaluation, the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that the design and operation of these disclosure controls and procedures were effective. Our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer have also concluded that there have not been any changes in our internal control over financial reporting that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.



ITEM 8B.  OTHER INFORMATION

None.

PART III

In accordance with the provisions of General Instruction G (3), information required by Items 9, 10, 11, 12 and 14 of Form 10-KSB are incorporated herein by reference to our Proxy Statement for the Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be filed prior to April 30, 2006.

ITEM 13.  EXHIBITS

 
(a)(1
The following financial statements of AMS Health Sciences, Inc. are included in Item 8:
 
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
F-2
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
F-3
Consolidated Balance Sheets as of December 31, 2005 and 2004
F-4
Consolidated Statements of Operations for Years Ended December 31, 2005, 2004 and 2003
F-5
Consolidated Statements of Shareholders’ Equity for Years Ended December 31, 2005, 2004 and 2003
F-6
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for Years Ended December 31, 2005, 2004 and 2003
F-7
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for Years Ended December 31, 2005, 2004 and 2003
F-8
 
 
(a)(2)
Financial Statement Schedules

All other schedules have been omitted since the required information is not present, or not present in amounts sufficient to require submission of the schedule, or because the information required is included in the consolidated financial statements or notes thereto.


(a) (3) Exhibits

Exhibit No Description

 3.1  The Registrant's Certificate of Incorporation, incorporated by reference to the Registration Statement on Form SB-2 (Registration No. 333-47801) filed with the commission on March 11, 1998.
   
 3.2  The Registrant's Bylaws, incorporated by reference to the Registration Statement on Form SB-2 (Registration No. 333-47801) filed with the commission on March 11, 1998.
   
 10.1  Stock Option Agreement of Advantage Marketing Systems dated January 3, 2001, incorporated by reference to Form 8-K filed with the Commission on January 8, 2001.
   
 10.2*  The Advantage Marketing Systems, Inc. 1995 Stock Option Plan, incorporated by reference to Form SB-2 Registration Statement (No. 33-80629), filed with the Commission on November 20, 1996.
   
 10.3*  Employment Agreement by and between David D’Arcangelo and Registrant dated effective as of November 25, 2002, incorporated by reference to Form 10-K/A filed with the Commission on March 31, 2003.
   
 10.4*  Non-qualified Stock Option Agreement by and between David D’Arcangelo and Registrant dated effective as of December 2, 2002, incorporated by reference to Form 10-K/A filed with the Commission on March 31, 2003.
   
 10.5*  The Advantage Marketing Systems, Inc. 2003 Stock Incentive Plan, incorporated by reference to Form S-8 Registration Statement (No. 333-109093), filed with the Commission on September 24, 2003.
   
 10.6  Fulfillment Services Agreement with Vita Sales & Distribution Multi-Country, dated January 19, 2004, incorporated by reference to Form 10-K filed with the Commission on March 29, 2004.
   
 10.7*      Employment Agreement by and between John W. Hail and Registrant dated effective as of November 4, 2003, incorporated by reference to Form 10-K filed with the Commission on March 29, 2004.
   
 
 



 10.8  Commercial Industrial Real Estate Purchase Contract dated August 12, 2004 by and between Registrant and Keltronics Corporation, incorporated by reference to Form 10-Q, filed with the commission on November 12, 2004.
   
 10.9*  Employment Agreement by and between Steven G. Kochen and Registrant dated effective as of August 9, 2005, incorporated by reference to Form 8-K filed with the Commission on August 12, 2005.
   
 10.10*  Employment Agreement by and between Jerry W. Grizzle and Registrant dated effective as of January 25, 2006, filed herewith.
   
 21  Subsidiaries, filed herewith.
   
 23.1  Consent of Cole & Reed PC, filed herewith.
   
 23.2  Consent of Grant Thornton LLP, filed herewith.
   
 31.1  Chief Executive Officer Certification, filed herewith.
   
 31.2  Chief Financial Officer Certification, filed herewith.
   
 32.1  Section 1350 Certification of our Chief Executive Officer, filed herewith.
   
 32.2  Section 1350 Certification of our Chief Financial Officer, filed herewith.
   
   *    Designates a compensatory plan.
 


SIGNATURES
 

In accordance with the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.


 
REGISTRANT:
 
AMS HEALTH SCIENCES, INC.
   
Date: March 31, 2006
By: /S/ JERRY W. GRIZZLE .
 
       Jerry W. Grizzle
 
       Chief Executive Officer, President, Chairman of the Board, and Director


In accordance with the Exchange Act, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated.


Date: March 31, 2006
By: /S/ JERRY W. GRIZZLE
 
       Jerry W. Grizzle
 
       Chief Executive Officer, President, Chairman of the Board and Director
   
Date: March 31, 2006
By: /S/ ROBIN L. JACOB
 
       Robin L. Jacob
 
       Chief Financial Offdicer, Vice President, Secretary, Treasurer and Director
   
Date: March 31, 2006
By: /S/ M. THOMAS BUXTON III
 
       M. Thomas Buxton III
 
       Director
   
Date: March 31, 2006
By: /S/ STEVEN M. DICKEY
 
       Steven M. Dickey
 
       Director
   
Date: March 31, 2006
By: /S/ STEPHEN E. JONES
 
       Stephen E. Jones
 
       Director






INDEX TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Page

AMS HEALTH SCIENCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
AUDITED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS:

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
F-2
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
F-3
Consolidated Balance Sheets as of December 31, 2005 and 2004
F-4
Consolidated Statements of Operations for Years Ended December 31, 2005, 2004 and 2003
F-5
Consolidated Statements of Shareholders’ Equity for Years Ended December 31, 2005, 2004 and 2003
F-6
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for Years Ended December 31, 2005, 2004 and 2003
F-7
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for Years Ended December 31, 2005, 2004 and 2003
F-8




REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM


To the Board of Directors and Stockholders of
AMS Health Sciences, Inc. and subsidiaries
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma


We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheet of AMS Health Sciences, Inc. and subsidiaries (the “Company”) as of December 31, 2005, and the related consolidated statements of operations, shareholders' equity, and cash flows for the year ended December 31, 2005. These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit.

We conducted our audit in accordance with standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. Our audit included consideration of internal control over financial reporting as a basis for designing audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit also includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of AMS Health Sciences, Inc. and subsidiaries as of December 31, 2005, and the results of their operations and their cash flows for the year ended December 31, 2005, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.



/S/ COLE & REED P.C.

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
March 28, 2006





REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM


Board of Directors and Stockholders
AMS Health Sciences, Inc. and Subsidiaries


We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheet of AMS Health Sciences, Inc. and subsidiaries (formerly Advantage Marketing Systems, Inc.) as of December 31, 2004, and the related consolidated statements of operations, stockholders’ equity, and cash flows for each of the two years in the period ended December 31, 2004. These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audits.

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. Our audits included consideration of internal control over financial reporting as a basis for dsigning audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit also includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of AMS Health Sciences, Inc. and Subsidiaries as of December 31, 2004, and the results of their operations and their cash flows for each of the two years in the period ended December 31, 2004, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.



/S/ GRANT THORNTON LLP

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
February 10, 2005





AMS HEALTH SCIENCES, INC.
AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
DECEMBER 31, 2005 AND 2004

ASSETS
 
2005
 
2004
 
CURRENT ASSETS:
             
Cash and cash equivalents
 
$
120,309
 
$
588,909
 
Marketable securities, available for sale, at fair value
   
278,131
   
2,803,863
 
Receivables, net of allowance of $175,172 and $0 respectively
   
404,682
   
236,318
 
Inventory, net
   
1,022,031
   
1,476,968
 
Other assets
   
24,542
   
50,739
 
Total current assets
   
1,849,695
   
5,156,797
 
RESTRICTED SECURITIES
   
75,477
   
 
RECEIVABLES
   
44,016
   
204,584
 
PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT, net
   
4,506,884
   
3,862,111
 
COVENANTS NOT TO COMPETE and other intangibles, net
   
402,370
   
480,187
 
OTHER ASSETS
   
26,795
   
38,924
 
TOTAL
 
$
6,905,237
 
$
9,742,603
 
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY
             
CURRENT LIABILITIES:
             
Accounts payable
 
$
537,422
 
$
326,784
 
Bank overdraft
   
203,500
   
395,936
 
Accrued commissions and bonuses
   
254,828
   
345,062
 
Accrued other expenses
   
385,729
   
587,173
 
Accrued sales tax liability
   
40,980
   
128,493
 
Notes payable
   
412,681
   
 
Capital lease obligations
   
80,150
   
111,430
 
Total current liabilities
   
1,915,290
   
1,894,878
 
LONG-TERM LIABILITES:
             
Notes payable
   
1,670,688
   
 
Capital lease obligations
   
74,320
   
205,874
 
Deferred compensation
   
615,301
   
671,748
 
Lease abandonment liability
   
110,249
   
171,412
 
Total liabilities
   
4,385,848
   
2,943,912
 
COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES (Notes 7 and 14)
             
SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY:
             
Common stock - $.0001 par value; authorized 495,000,000 shares; issued 8,344,803 and 7,496,385 shares; outstanding 7,766,574 and6,904,790 shares, respectively
   
835
   
750
 
Paid-in capital
   
21,870,872
   
20,331,852
 
Notes receivable for exercise of options
   
(31,000
)
 
(31,000
)
Accumulated deficit
   
(16,674,324
)
 
(10,955,185
)
Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss), net of tax
   
(14,215
)
 
85,053
 
Total capital and accumulated deficit
   
5,152,168
   
9,431,470
 
Less cost of treasury stock (591,595 shares)
   
(2,632,779
)
 
(2,632,779
)
Total shareholders’ equity
   
2,519,389
   
6,798,691
 
TOTAL
 
$
6,905,237
 
$
9,742,603
 

See notes to consolidated financial statements.



AMS HEALTH SCIENCES, INC.
AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2005, 2004 AND 2003

   
2005
 
2004
 
2003
 
 
Net sales
 
$
13,701,324
 
$
18,203,497
 
$
18,486,178
 
 
Cost of sales
   
10,436,056
   
14,588,521
   
12,750,336
 
 
Gross profit
   
3,265,268
   
3,614,976
   
5,735,842
 
 
Marketing, distribution and administrative expenses:
                   
 
Marketing
   
1,169,768
   
1,536,777
   
1,538,981
 
 
Distribution and administration
   
5,972,700
   
6,684,801
   
7,124,894
 
 
Total marketing, distribution and administrative expenses
   
7,142,468
   
8,221,578
   
8,663,875
 
 
Loss from operations
   
(3,877,200
)
 
(4,606,602
)
 
(2,928,033
)
 
Other income (expense):
                   
 
Interest and dividends, net
   
(3,159
)
 
162,161
   
(74,704
)
 
Other income (expense), net
   
147,111
   
113,236
   
(156,963
)
 
Total other income (expense)
   
143,952
   
275,397
   
(231,667
)
 
Loss before taxes
   
(3,733,248
)
 
(4,331,205
)
 
(3,159,700
)
 
Income tax expense (benefit)
   
32,835
   
1,936,262
   
(590,839
)
 
NET LOSS
 
$
(3,766,083
)
$
(6,267,467
)
$
(2,568,861
)
 
Net loss per common share - basic
 
$
(.52
)
$
(.90
)
$
(.57
)
 
Net loss per common share - assuming dilution
 
$
(.52
)
$
(.90
)
$
(.57
)
 
Weighted average common shares outstanding - basic
   
7,307,455
   
6,946,085
   
4,508,986
 
 
Weighted average common shares - assuming dilution
   
7,307,455
   
6,946,085
   
4,508,986
 

See notes to consolidated financial statements.




AMS HEALTH SCIENCES, INC.
AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY
YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2005, 2004 AND 2003
   
 
 
 
 
 
Shares (See Note 9)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Common Stock
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Paid-In Capital
 
 
 
 
Notes Receivable for Exercise of Options
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(Accumulated Deficit)
 
 
 
 
 
Comprehensive Income (Loss)
 
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss), Net of Tax
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Treasury Stock
 
 
 
 
 
Total Share holders’ Equity
 
BALANCE,JANUARY 1, 2003
   
4,424,314
 
$
490
 
$
11,793,240
 
$
(31,000
)
$
(2,118,857
)
     
$
(68,968
)
$
(2,244,476
)
$
7,330,429
 
Options exercised with cash
   
369,838
   
37
   
1,090,483
   
   
   
   
   
   
1,090,520
 
Warrants exercised with cash
   
581,575
   
58
   
2,131,217
   
   
   
   
   
   
2,131,275
 
Stock issued
   
56,785
   
5
   
145,243
   
   
   
   
   
   
145,248
 
Comprehensive Income (loss):
                                                       
Net Loss
   
   
   
   
   
(2,568,861
)
 
(2,568,861
)
 
   
   
(2,568,861
)
Unrealized gain available for sale securities, net of tax
   
   
   
   
   
   
165,252
   
165,252
   
   
165,252
 
Comprehensive loss
   
   
   
   
   
 
$
(2,403,609
)
 
   
   
 
BALANCE, DECEMBER 31, 2003
   
5,432,512
   
590
   
15,160,183
   
(31,000
)
 
(4,687,718
)
       
96,284
   
(2,244,476
)
 
8,293,863
 
Options exercised with cash
   
416,014
   
42
   
1,177,994
   
   
   
   
   
   
1,178,036
 
Warrants exercised with cash
   
1,170,064
   
117
   
3,978,101
   
   
   
   
   
   
3,978,218
 
Stock issued
   
5,000
   
1
   
13,999
   
   
   
   
   
   
14,000
 
Disgorgement of profits
   
   
   
1,575
   
   
   
   
   
   
1,575
 
Purchase of Treasury Stock
   
(118,800
)
 
   
   
   
   
   
   
(388,303
)
 
(388,303
)
Comprehensive Loss:
                                                       
Net Loss
   
   
   
   
   
(6,267,467
)
 
(6,267,467
)
 
   
   
(6,267,467
)
Unrealized loss available for sale securities, net of tax
   
   
   
   
   
   
(11,231
)
 
(11,231
)
 
   
(11,231
)
Comprehensive loss
   
   
   
   
   
 
$
(6,278,698
)
 
   
   
 
BALANCE, DECEMBER 31, 2004
   
6,904,790
 
$
750
 
$
20,331,852
 
$
(31,000
)
$
(10,955,185
)
     
$
85,053
 
$
(2,632,779
)
$
6,798,691
 
Options exercised with cash
   
640,918
   
64
   
1,194,327
   
   
   
   
   
   
1,194,391
 
Stock issued
   
20,866
   
1
   
18,962
   
   
   
   
   
   
18,963
 
Acquisition
   
200,000
   
20
   
317,980
   
   
(1,953,056
)
 
   
   
   
(1,635,056
)
Disgorgement of profits
   
   
   
7,751
   
   
   
   
   
   
7,751
 
Comprehensive Loss:
                                                       
Net Loss
   
   
   
   
   
(3,766,083
)
 
(3,766,083
)
 
   
   
(3,766,083
)
Unrealized loss available for sale securities, net of tax
   
   
   
   
   
   
(99,268
)
 
(99,268
)
 
   
(99,268
)
Comprehensive loss
   
   
   
   
   
 
$
(3,865,351
)
 
   
   
 
BALANCE, DECEMBER 31, 2005
   
7,766,574
 
$
835
 
$
21,870,872
 
$
(31,000
)
$
(16,674,324
)
     
$
(14,215
)
$
(2,632,779
)
$
2,519,389
 

See notes to consolidated financial statements.



AMS HEALTH SCIENCES, INC.
AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2005, 2004 AND 2003

   
2005
 
2004
 
2003
 
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITES:
                   
Net loss
 
$
(3,766,083
)
$
(6,267,467
)
$
(2,568,861
)
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:
                   
Depreciation and amortization
   
820,746
   
865,436
   
982,168
 
Bad debt expense
   
175,172
             
Stock issued for services
   
18,963
   
14,000
   
73,600
 
Employee compensation recognized upon exercise of stock options
   
66,602
   
205,923
   
282,653
 
Deferred taxes
   
32,835
   
1,894,822
   
(590,839
)
Loss (gain) on sale of assets
   
(5,468
)
 
25,719
   
117,273
 
Realized (gain) loss on sale of marketable securities
   
(123,098
)
 
(122,165
)
 
52,557
 
Inventory obsolescence expense
   
86,352
   
   
 
Changes in assets and liabilities which provided (used) cash:
                   
Receivables
   
58,574
   
204,458
   
(310,645
)
Inventory
   
642,051
   
(575,439
)
 
(103,377
)
Prepaid taxes and income tax receivable
   
   
464,975
   
 
Other assets
   
26,198
   
(8,028
)
 
2,478
 
Accounts payable and accrued expenses
   
(548,532
)
 
356,432
   
352,330
 
Lease abandonment liability
   
16,852
   
171,412
   
 
Deferred compensation
   
(56,447
)
 
3,675
   
668,073
 
Net cash used in operating activities
   
(2,555,283
)
 
(2,766,247
)
 
(1,042,590
)
                     
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES:
                   
Purchases of property and equipment
   
(247,520
)
 
(1,322,873
)
 
(406,891
)
Sales of property and equipment
   
283,906
   
307,696
   
25,678
 
Acquisition of new business, net of cash acquired
   
(1,203,587
)
 
   
 
Receipts on notes receivable
   
12,274
   
4,369
   
123,593
 
Repayment of related party receivables
   
   
   
63,562
 
Purchase of marketable securities, available for sale
   
(4,708,594
)
 
(8,342,687
)
 
(1,240,980
)
Sale of marketable securities, available for sale
   
7,149,842
   
7,519,941
   
1,197,841
 
Net cash provided by (used in) in investing activities
   
1,286,321
   
(1,833,554
)
 
(237,197
)
                     
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES:
                   
Overdrafts
   
(203,500
)
 
395,936
   
 
Proceeds from issuance of common stock
   
1,228,540
   
973,687
   
879,515
 
Proceeds from exercise of warrants
   
   
3,978,218
   
2,131,275
 
Purchases of treasury stock
   
   
(388,303
)
 
 
Payment of notes payable
   
(57,207
)
 
(1,989,170
)
 
(486,586
)
Principal payment on capital lease obligations
   
(167,471
)
 
(90,939
)
 
(142,435
)
Net cash provided by financing activities
   
800,362
   
2,879,429
   
2,381,769
 
                     
NET INCREASE (DECREASE) IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS
   
(468,600
)
 
(1,720,372
)
 
1,101,982
 
CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS, BEGINNING
   
588,909
   
2,309,281
   
1,207,299
 
CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS, ENDING
 
$
120,309
 
$
588,909